Lygia Clark. Study for Planes in Modulated Surface (Planos em superfície modulada). 1957

Lygia Clark Study for Planes in Modulated Surface (Planos em superfície modulada) 1957

  • Not on view

Clark, a painter, sculptor, and performance artist, studied in Paris then returned to her native Brazil in 1952. Influenced by the abstract compositions she saw in Europe, she rejected her early figurative style and began working with geometric abstraction. The Modulated Surfaces series she created between 1954 and 1958 is one of her earliest experiments with the formal and spatial effects of geometric forms on a flat picture plane.

Gallery label from Geo/Metric: Prints and Drawings from the Collection, June 11–August 18, 2008.
Medium
Cut-and-pasted paper on colored paper
Dimensions
15 3/4 x 15 3/4" (40 x 40 cm)
Credit
Latin American and Caribbean Fund through gift of Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr.
Object number
1395.2007.a-b
Department
Drawings and Prints

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