Centenary of Jean Vigo

April 29–30, 2005

MoMA

L’Atalante. 1934. France. Directed by Jean Vigo

To mark the centenary of the birth of Jean Vigo (1905––1934), the Museum presents the auteur’s complete works—A propos de Nice (1930), Taris, roi de l’eau (1931), Zéro de conduite (1933), and L’Atalante (1934)—over the course of a single day. Although Vigo made only four films before his untimely death at age 29, all of them are masterpieces informed by his social engagement and unerring artistic flair and ambition. This celebration of Vigo’s independent spirit is also the occasion to announce a MoMA exhibition in 2006 of selected winners of the prestigious Prix Jean Vigo, awarded annually since 1951 by a jury of French film professionals headed by the filmmaker’s daughter, Luce Vigo.

Organized by Jytte Jensen, Curator, Department of Film and Media, and Véronique Godard, independent consultant, Paris.

Prints courtesy Cinémathèque Gaumont and the Cinémathèque Française. Thanks to the Cultural Services of the French Embassy, New York.

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