Rialto Pictures: Reviving Classic Cinema

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Jul 25–Aug 10, 2007

MoMA

Billy Liar. 1963. Great Britain. Directed by John Schlesinger.

Over the past ten years Rialto Pictures has enriched American film culture by both reviving a significant number of classic films not seen in theaters since their original runs and premiering extraordinary films never before distributed in America. Taking care to release fresh, and often restored, 35mm prints with new English subtitles, Rialto has given a new generation of filmgoers the opportunity to experience the works of masters—such as Robert Bresson, Luis Buñuel, Jules Dassin, Federico Fellini, and Carol Reed, to name a few—as they were meant to be seen, and invites those who saw these films years ago to revisit them. MoMA salutes Bruce Goldstein, founder of Rialto Pictures, and his partner Adrienne Halpern for keeping classic cinema invigorated and contemporary.

Organized by Laurence Kardish, Senior Curator, with notes by Leigh Goldstein, Executive Assistant, Department of Film.

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