Installation view of Projects 33: Matthew McCaslin at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Mali Olatunji

A site-specific installation by Matthew McCaslin, an American artist known for his use of industrial material, Projects 33: Matthew McCaslin at once resembles a surrealistic stage set and recalls a construction site.

For this installation, a large grid composed of floor-to-ceiling metal studs and horizontally arranged plug boxes is interlaced by cable and illuminated by a single naked bulb. Positioned between the screen-like layers of the grid are five clocks, each set to a different time; like the solitary light, all are controlled by a switch placed within reach of the viewer. Simple in its plan and execution, the work is at once familiar and strange. According to a written statement by the artist, “This installation exists between unfinished architecture and a self-contained system [it] flirts with our physical and metaphysical relationship to time, place, and consumption of energy.”

Organized by Fereshteh Daftari, research assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture.

The Projects series is made possibly by generous grants from The Bohen Foundation, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Installation views

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA's collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

If you would like to license audio or video footage produced by MoMA, please contact Scala Archives (all geographic locations) at firenze@scalarchives.com.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication or moma.org, please email text_permissions@moma.org. If you would like to publish text from MoMA's archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to archives@moma.org.

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to digital@moma.org.