Ralph Schraivogel. Archigram 1961–74 (Museum für Gestaltung). 1995. Silkscreen, 50⅜ × 35⅝″ (128 × 90.5 cm). Gift of the designer

Cut ’n’ Paste: From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City

July 10, 2013–January 5, 2014 The Museum of Modern Art

The ethos of collage shapes every aspect of contemporary culture, from the glut of signs and images to the many layers of digital information to the art of sampling. This installation revisits early uses of collage to trace its evolution as both an aesthetic technique central to architectural representation and a cultural practice of layering, juxtaposition, and remix that configures the city. Opening with the seamless digital collages that dominate contemporary architectural practice, Cut ’n’ Paste pairs the early photo-collages of Mies van der Rohe with avant-garde experiments in photomontage, graphic design, and film. Architectural thinkers Colin Rowe and Fred Koetter’s Collage City (1978), an urban manifesto for the medium, provides a backdrop through which to reframe contemporary uses. As an architectural tool, this wide-ranging medium mixes high and popular references and offers a dynamic, inventive connection to cultural context.

Organized by Pedro Gadanho, Curator, and Phoebe Springstubb, Curatorial Assistant, Department of
Architecture and Design.

Architecture and Design Collection Exhibitions are made possible by Hyundai Card.

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