Willem de Ridder. European Mail-order Warehouse/Fluxshop. Winter 1964–65. photo: Wim van der Linden/MAI. The Museum of Modern Art. Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection Gift

From the outset of Fluxus during the early 1960s, artist editions were central among the formats explored by the network of individuals who embraced this movement’s experimental practices. Among them, artist and designer George Maciunas conceived of Fluxus Editions—affordable and portable publications and multiples meant to introduce revolutionary art into everyday experience and to publicize the group’s ideas on an international scale. Often housed in small boxes or kits, the works incorporate photography, performance scores, film, and found objects, reflecting an interdisciplinary and conceptual approach. Dozens of projects resulted, including works by George Brecht, Robert Filliou, Willem de Ridder, Milan Knížák, Alison Knowles, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, Benjamin Patterson, Mieko Shiomi, Ben Vautier, and Robert Watts. Drawn largely from the Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection Gift, this exhibition explores the many aspects of the group’s innovative production.

Organized by Gretchen L. Wagner, The Sue and Eugene Mercy, Jr., Assistant Curator, Department of Prints and Illustrated Books, and Jon Hendricks, Fluxus Consulting Curator.

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