In 1928, the Brazilian painter Tarsila do Amaral created Abaporu, a painting that took its name from the Tupi-Guarani words aba (man) and poru (who eats human flesh). This image sparked the Anthropophagy movement, which held that Brazil could assert its postcolonial independence by symbolically “cannibalizing” other cultures. We’ll explore this work and others to learn what the concept meant to Tarsila and her contemporaries. This session meets at the entrance to Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil, Floor 2.

This session is led by Lauren Kaplan.

Join us for lively conversations and engaging activities, facilitated by Museum educators, that offer insightful and unusual ways to engage with collections and special exhibitions. Groups meet in the galleries noted on the schedule. Gallery Sessions are free for members and Museum admission ticket holders. No registration is required.

FM headsets for sound amplification are available for all talks.

  1. Tuesday, May 15,
    11:30 a.m.

    The Museum of Modern Art, Floor 2
    Free with Museum admission
  2. Thursday, April 19,
    11:30 a.m.

    The Museum of Modern Art, Floor 2
  3. Tuesday, April 10,
    1:30 p.m.

    The Museum of Modern Art, Floor 2
  4. Monday, March 19,
    11:30 a.m.

    The Museum of Modern Art, Floor 2
  5. Wednesday, March 7,
    1:30 p.m.

    The Museum of Modern Art, Floor 2
This event is part of Gallery Sessions.