Introduction
Charles Green Shaw (1 May 1892 – 2 April 1974) was an American painter and writer. A significant figure in American abstract art, Shaw enjoyed a varied career as a writer and illustrator, poet, modernist painter, and collector. Born to a wealthy family and orphaned at a young age, Charles and his twin brother were raised by their uncle, Frank D. Shaw. At age nine, he was already an avid painter and had illustrated his first book, The Costumes of Nations. He also wrote and illustrated the children's book, It Looked Like Spilt Milk, published in 1947. Shaw graduated from Yale in 1914, where he contributed artwork to campus humor magazine The Yale Record. At Yale, he was also a member of the St. Anthony Hall aka Delta Psi Fraternity [1], and completed a year of architectural studies at Columbia University. He worked as a freelance writer for The New Yorker, The Smart Set, and Vanity Fair, where his focus was the 1920s theater and café society. In 1927, Shaw enrolled in Thomas Hart Benton's class at the Art Students League of New York. He also studied privately with George Luks. Shaw’s work is part of most major collections of American Art, including the Whitney Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Guggenheim, the Smithsonian Institution, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Corcoran Gallery. As a founding member of the American Abstract Artists Shaw participated in the first annual exhibition. His article, A Word to the Objector, was included in the group's first publication.
Wikidata
Q5078400
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Nationality
American
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Author, Painter, Photographer
Names
Charles Green Shaw, Charles Shaw, Charles G. Shaw
Ulan
500025487
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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