Introduction
Nam June Paik (Korean: 백남준; July 20, 1932 – January 29, 2006) was a Korean American artist. He worked with a variety of media and is considered to be the founder of video art. He is credited with an early usage (1974) of the term "electronic super highway" in application to telecommunications.
Wikidata
Q158056
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Introduction
Paik is known for his sculpture and installations employing television sets, video screens and junk assemblage, and is considered the inventor of video art. He began his career as a musician and wrote his thesis at Tokyo University on Arnold Shoenberg. He continued his studies in Munich and Freiburg, and gravitated to the avant-garde music scene in Cologne and Darmstadt, where he worked with Karlheinz Stockhausen. He met John Cage and began incorporating elements of what would become performance art into musical events, which led to an involvement with the Fluxus group. He exhibited the first known art work to incorporate television sets in 1963, and is perhaps most widely known for his collaborations with Charlotte Moorman, beginning in 1965, which resulted in the creation of his "TV Bra for Living Sculpture." He is credited with coining the phrase "electronic superhighway." Major retrospectives of his work were held at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1982, and the Guggenheim Museum in 2000.
Nationalities
South Korean, American, Korean
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Teacher, Writer, Musician, Performance Artist, Sculptor, Video Artist
Names
Nam June Paik, Naum June Paik
Ulan
500118744
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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