Introduction
Carl A. Morris (May 12, 1911 – June 3, 1993) was an American painter. Morris was born in Yorba Linda, California and he studied at the Chicago Art Institute and in Paris and Vienna. He opened the Spokane Art Center through the Federal Art Project during the Great Depression. Morris met his wife, sculptor Hilda Grossman, when he recruited her as a teacher for the center. Moving to Seattle in 1940, they met Mark Tobey and became lifelong friends. In 1941, he was commissioned to paint murals for the Eugene, Oregon post office. The Morrises settled in Portland, Oregon and established their artistic careers, beginning as figurative artists and gradually moving toward abstract art. They often visited New York to see friends such as Mark Rothko, Robert Motherwell, Joseph Campbell and Lionel Trilling but declined to relocate, wanting to avoid what they saw as a climate of commercialism and artistic distraction. Morris is known today for his strong Abstract Impressionist paintings.His work can be seen in collections throughout the U.S., including those of the Portland Art Museum, the Tacoma Art Museum, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, the Vollum Institute, Reed College, the Boise Art Museum, the Denver Art Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. During his life, his work was shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Seattle Art Museum.
Wikidata
Q5040566
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Nationality
American
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Painter
Names
Carl Morris, Carl A. Morris
Ulan
500025496
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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