Introduction
Victor Pierre Horta (French: [ɔʁta]; Victor, Baron Horta after 1932; 6 January 1861 – 8 September 1947) was a Belgian architect and designer, and one of the founders of the Art Nouveau movement. His Hôtel Tassel in Brussels built in 1892-3, is often considered the first Art Nouveau house, and, along with three of his other early houses, is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The curving stylized vegetal forms that Horta used influenced many others, including architect Hector Guimard, who used it in the first house he designed in Paris and in the entrances he designed for the Paris Metro. He is also considered a precursor of modern architecture for his open floor plans and his innovative use of iron, steel and glass.His later work moved away from Art Nouveau, and became more geometric and formal, with classical touches, such as columns. He made a highly original use of steel frames and skylights to bring light into the structures, open floor plans, and finely-designed decorative details. His later major works included the Maison du Peuple in Brussels, (1895-1900); The Centre for Fine Arts, Brussels (1923-1929); and the Brussels Central Station (1913-1952). In 1932 King Albert I of Belgium conferred on Horta the title of Baron for his services to the field of architecture. Four of the buildings he designed have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Wikidata
Q49744
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Introduction
Belgian architect and designer.
Nationality
Belgian
Gender
Male
Roles
Architect, Designer, Teacher
Names
Victor Horta, Baron Victor Horta, baron Victor Horta, Victor Horta baron
Ulan
500032216
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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