Introduction
Maria Montoya Martinez (1887, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico – July 20, 1980, San Ildefonso Pueblo) was a Native American artist who created internationally known pottery. Martinez (born Maria Poveka Montoya), her husband Julian, and other family members examined traditional Pueblo pottery styles and techniques to create pieces which reflect the Pueblo people's legacy of fine artwork and crafts. Martinez was from the San Ildefonso Pueblo, a community located 20 miles northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico. At an early age, she learned pottery skills from her aunt and recalls this "learning by seeing" starting at age eleven, as she watched her aunt, grandmother, and father's cousin work on their pottery during the 1890s. During this time, Spanish tinware and Anglo enamelware had become readily available in the Southwest, making the creation of traditional cooking and serving pots less necessary. Traditional pottery making techniques were being lost, but Martinez and her family experimented with different techniques and helped preserve the cultural art.
Wikidata
Q2660929
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Nationalities
American, Native American, San Ildefonso
Gender
Female
Roles
Artist, Potter, Ceramicist
Names
Maria Martinez, Maria Povera Martínez, Maria Montoya, Maria Montoya Martinez, Maria Povera Martinez, Maria Antonia Montoya, Poh've'ka, Poveka
Ulan
500127102
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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