Introduction
Lenore "Lee" Krasner (October 27, 1908 – June 19, 1984) was an American abstract expressionist painter, with a strong speciality in collage, who was married to Jackson Pollock. This somewhat overshadowed her contribution at the time, though there was much cross-pollination between their two styles. Krasner’s training, influenced by George Bridgman and Hans Hofmann, was the more formalized, especially in the depiction of human anatomy, and this enriched Pollock’s more intuitive and unstructured output. Krasner is now seen as a key transitional figure within abstraction, who connected early-20th-century art with the new ideas of postwar America, and her work fetches high prices at auction. She is one of the few female artists to have had a retrospective show at the Museum of Modern Art.
Wikidata
Q237959
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Nationality
American
Gender
Female
Roles
Artist, Painter
Names
Lee Krasner, Lee Pollock, Mrs. Jackson Pollock, Lenore Krasner, Lee Pollock Krasner, Lenore Krassner, Lee Krasner Pollock
Ulan
500010144
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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