Introduction
Wolfgang Mattheuer (7 April 1927—7 April 2004) was a German painter, graphic artist and sculptor. Together with Werner Tübke and Bernhard Heisig he was a leading representative of the Leipzig School, a figurative art current in East Germany. He came to prominence with allegorical, pessimistic and sometimes heroic paintings which were accused of expressing political dissidence. He was later an open critic of both socialism and capitalism. He taught at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst Leipzig (HGB) for many years. In 1974 he resigned from his position as professor at the HGB to work as a freelance painter. In 1988 he left the Socialist Unity Party of Germany.In the West he was for a long time seen as an untrendy Sunday painter, but a large retrospective held in Chemnitz for his 75th birthday raised his profile. He was married to the painter Ursula Mattheuer-Neustädt.
Wikidata
Q87268
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Nationality
German
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Painter, Sculptor
Name
Wolfgang Mattheuer
Ulan
500112855
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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