A-|A+

MoMA

FILM EXHIBITIONS

Acteurism: The Emergence of Ann Sheridan, 1937–1943

October 1–November 21, 2014

View related film screenings

Following Charles Silver’s popular An Auteurist History of Film program, we begin a new series of daytime screenings, drawn from MoMA’s collection, devoted to actors who were able to develop their screen personalities with sufficient consistency and vivacity that they themselves became vehicles of meaning in their movies. Stars such as John Wayne, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, and Barbara Stanwyck carried a nexus of emotional, moral, and social values with them from movie to movie, which their directors were able to variously celebrate, criticize, and exploit. The series begins with Ann Sheridan, tracing one of the warmest, sharpest, and most provocative personalities of the 1940s from her beginnings as a bit player and B-movie lead. All films are from the U.S. and presented in 35mm.

Organized by Dave Kehr, Adjunct Curator, Department of Film.
<i>Edge of Darkness</i>. 1943. USA. Directed by Lewis Milestone

Edge of Darkness. 1943. USA. Directed by Lewis Milestone