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FILM SCREENINGS

<i>Eyes Wide Shut.</i> 1999. USA. Directed by Stanley Kubrick
  • Entrée de cinématographe à Vienne

    1896. France. Cinématographe Lumière. 1 min.

  • Le Ring

    1896. France. Cinématographe Lumière. 1 min.

  • Eyes Wide Shut

    1999. USA. Stanley Kubrick. 159 min.

and more

Sunday, March 2, 2014, 5:00 p.m.

Theater 2 (The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2), T2



  • Entrée de cinématographe à Vienne

    1896. France. Produced by Cinématographe Lumière. These two films constitute the earliest moving images of Vienna, from the days when Schnitzler, Freud and the frères Lumière first broke through to the Other Side of modern life. And what an entrée: In the fall of 1896, a young man walking on Vienna’s fashionable Kärntnerstrasse briefly stops and looks straight into the cinematograph. His gaze has been attracted by a newfangled apparatus that stands in the middle of the sidewalk. But he also looks into the future, and at everyone who has since viewed this recording, even at those who have yet to see it. What this young man, who was not yet a moviegoer, could not possibly know at the time was how his gaze and his existence would echo to our present day. Both short films courtesy The Austrian Film Museum. 1 min.

  • Le Ring

    1896. France. Produced by Cinématographe Lumière. 1 min.

  • Eyes Wide Shut

    1999. USA. Directed by Stanley Kubrick. Screenplay by Kubrick, Frederic Raphael. With Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, Sydney Pollack. Adapted from Arthur Schnitzler’s Dream Story, one of the essential texts in modern literature, Kubrick’s swan song transplants the Vienna bourgeoisie of the early twentieth century into an impossibly posh, artificial, and fully studio-built New York at the turn of the millennium. Schnitzler (1862–1931) was an avid cinemagoer and also deeply in tune with the radical theories of Sigmund Freud, who regarded him as some sort of doppelganger. But neither man had any hope that the “plot-obsessed” film industry of their era could find a language worthy of their own, or could approximate their understanding of fantasy, sexuality, and the unconscious. Notwithstanding the triumphs of Max Ophuls’s later Schnitzler adaptations (La Ronde, Liebelei), it would be nearly eight decades before a mainstream filmmaker found a way of honoring the author’s fragmented, destabilizing notions of truth and reality. Eyes Wide Shut began with a casting coup (the real-world Cruise-Kidman marriage and its media repercussions added immeasurably to this dark story of a couple’s fantasy life), and it ended with the brouhaha over a masked ball/orgy—censored in the United States a few months after the director had died. By 2014, however, Kubrick’s narcotic, disturbing series of role-playing games and waking dreams seems to have arrived at its intended destination: an audience for whom Sin City has become SimCity, a place where acts of transgression (or simply “going out”) are no longer exclusively tied to the realist mode of bodies in motion. As if sensing the world that was about to unfold, Eyes Wide Shut can today be viewed as a narrative structured by clicks, hyperlinks, and avatars. And then you wake up, with the last words of Schnitzler’s novel: “’No dream,’ he sighed quietly, ‘is altogether a dream.’” Courtesy Warner Bros. 159 min.

In the Film exhibition Vienna Unveiled: A City in Cinema

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