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FILM SCREENINGS

<i>Frantz Fanon, Black Skin White Mask.</i> 1996. Great Britain. Directed by Isaac Julien. Photograph by Mark Nash, ©Normal Films
  • The Attendant

    1993. Great Britain. Isaac Julien. 8 min.

  • Frantz Fanon, Black Skin White Mask

    1996. Great Britain. Isaac Julien. 68 min.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014, 5:00 p.m.

Theater 2 (The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2), T2



  • The Attendant

    1993. Great Britain. Directed by Isaac Julien. After-hours at a museum, a white, leather-clad visitor and a middle-aged black attendant are the only ones remaining; in an instant, paintings narrating the history of slavery spring to life, studded collars and whips charged with both colonial and sadomasochism references. With appearances by Stuart Hall and Hanif Kureishi, The Attendant is rococo semiotics at its finest. 8 min.

  • Frantz Fanon, Black Skin White Mask

    1996. Great Britain. Directed by Isaac Julien. Frantz Fanon, a portrait of the father of postcolonial theory, draws out the richness of Fanon’s intellectual legacy, from his contributions to psychiatry (the seminal Wretched of the Earth initially having been written as a medical dissertation) to his support of armed struggle in Algeria and Tunisia. Stylized reconstructions mark key moments in Fanon’s life, such as his experience of being designated as black, not French, on his first visit to France after having fought with the French in World War II. Combined with the voices of relatives, friends, and cultural critics, the film engages with the many sides of Fanon, while probing at the form of documentary. A clip from the fictional but indelible The Battle of Algiers is an apt reminder that visualizing theory and imagining history are constructive tools for looking both into the past and at oneself. 68 min.

In the Film exhibition Critical Reverie: The Films of Isaac Julien

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