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MoMA

FILM SCREENINGS

<em>Color</em>. 1958. Uruguay. Directed by Lidia García Millán. Image courtesy of the artist.
  • Color

    1958. Uruguay. Lidia García Millán. 3 min.

  • Tres tristes tigres

    1968. Chile. Raúl Ruiz. 105 min.

Sunday, October 23, 2011, 1:15 p.m.

Theater 2 (The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2), T2



  • Color

    1958. Uruguay. Directed and animated by Lidia García Millán. A beautiful abstract animation, believed to be the first of its kind from Uruguay, with music by the house band of the Hot Club de Montevideo. Preserved by the NYU Orphan Film Project and BB Optics, for the Fundacion de Arte Contemporáneo (Montevideo) and the filmmaker. 3 min.

  • Tres tristes tigres

    1968. Chile. Written and directed by Raúl Ruiz. With Shenda Román, Nelson Villagra, Luis Alarcón. To Save and Project remembers the uniquely gifted and prolific Chilean filmmaker Ruiz (1944–2011), who in more than 100 films over 48 years—many of them in exile after the Pinochet coup of 1973—subverted nearly every convention and genre of cinema. Ruiz’s sensuous, metaphysical fantasies and ironical literary deconstructions confound all manner of spatial and temporal logic, and have been likened to those of Borges and Nabokov. Presented in a rare archival print—though not preserved—courtesy of the Cineteca Nacional de Chile and Arcadia Films, Tres tristes tigres is his first feature film, which proclaimed a short-lived but influential “new wave” of Chilean cinema to international audiences after winning the top prize of the Locarno Film Festival. Adapted from a play by Alejandro Sieveking about shady doings among Santiago’s marginalized underclass—including a brother who prostitutes his sister—the film has a playful, self-referential style that incorporates Brechtian elements of alienation and class consciousness, dissolving the barrier between the actors and the camera. It was, as Ruiz observed, “an attempt to tackle the embarrassment of Mexican melodrama by a kind of inversion, as if the camera were in the opposite position, showing the secondary characters, extras waiting for the big scene to take place.” Tres tristes tigres betrays Ruiz’s formative years as a playwright, and also has echoes of John Cassavetes’ Shadows, an avowed influence, and Jacques Rivette’s Paris nous appartient (Paris Belongs to Us). In Spanish; English subtitles. 105 min.