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FILM SCREENINGS

  • Kino-Pravda No. 23 (Radio Pravda)

    1925. USSR. Dziga Vertov. Approx. 23 min.

  • Stride, Soviet! (The Moscow Soviet in the Present, Past, and Future)

    1926. USSR. Dziga Vertov. Approx. 70 min.

With piano accompaniment by Donald Sosin

Saturday, April 30, 2011, 4:00 p.m.

Theater 2 (The Roy and Niuta Titus Theater 2), T2



  • Kino-Pravda No. 23 (Radio Pravda)

    1925. USSR. Directed by Dziga Vertov. Though only a third of this final issue of Kino-Pravda seems to survive, we are nonetheless treated to Aleksandr Bushkin’s time-lapse animation and his brilliant sequence in which, as Yuri Tsivian describes, “a cross-section of a photographically correct izba (Russian peasant’s log hut) is penetrated by schematically charted radio waves”—a testament to the magical properties and propagandistic uses of radio in reaching out to Russia’s distant peasantry. Unedited print. Approx. 23 min.

  • Stride, Soviet! (The Moscow Soviet in the Present, Past, and Future)

    1926. USSR. Directed by Dziga Vertov. As head of Kultkino, Goskino’s documentary section, Vertov was commissioned to make an election-year campaign film on behalf of the sitting Mossovet (Moscow Municipal Soviet). Never one to follow orders, he failed to include any images of Mossovet officials at work, or any evidence of their achievements, and the film was thus denounced by the Presidium Committee of the Moscow Soviet and largely boycotted by movie theaters. Their loss is our gain, however, because we can see Vertov’s 1922 manifesto “WE” put into practice: “For his inability to control his movements,” Vertov wrote, “WE temporarily exclude man as a subject for film. Our path leads through a poetry of machines, from the bungling citizen to the perfect electric man.” Automobiles, engines, factory tools are literally brought to life—“the hearts of the machines are beating”—and operate in perfect synchronicity toward the advancement of the New Russia. Silent. Approx. 70 min.

In the Film exhibition Dziga Vertov

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