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Landscapes: Real and Imagined

Discover groundbreaking techniques in early modern landscape paintings.


Modern Landscapes

Discover groundbreaking techniques in early modern landscape paintings.


Port-en-Bessin, Entrance to the Harbor

Georges-Pierre Seurat
(French, 1859–1891)

1888. Oil on canvas, 21 5/8 x 25 5/8" (54.9 x 65.1 cm)

Georges-Pierre Seurat, like Impressionist painters before him, was very interested in painting light, and studied optical theory to develop his painting technique. Known as pointillismSeurat’s painting technique involved building up an image by carefully placing small dots of color side by side. When viewed up close, one is aware of the many small dots of varied color. When viewed from a distance, the dots fuse together to create a coherent image. Artists like Seurat, who became known as Neo-Impressionists, believed that this painstaking method of painting was the most scientific and precise way to record color and light.

A technique of painting developed by French painters Georges-Pierre Seurat and Paul Signac, in which small, distinct points of unmixed color are applied in patterns to form an image.

The method with which an artist, writer, performer, athlete, or other producer employs technical skills or materials to achieve a finished product or endeavor.

A 19th-century art movement, associated especially with French artists, whose works are characterized by relatively small, thin, visible brushstrokes that coalesce to form a single scene and emphasize movement and the changing qualities of light. Anti-academic in its formal aspects, Impressionism also involved the establishment of independent exhibitions outside of the established and official venues of the day.

The perceived hue of an object, produced by the manner in which it reflects or emits light into the eye. Also, a substance, such as a dye, pigment, or paint, that imparts a hue.