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MoMA

MoMA CLASSES

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The People’s Art Center

A central part of MoMA's program from 1948 to 1961, The People’s Art Center was conceived as an incubator for critical thinking, art making, and creativity. It's this mission that drives what we do today, and that inspired our new series of programs.

Immerse yourself in ideas and opportunities to see your world in new ways through art. Classes, artist-led immersions, and experiences can help you develop new perspectives and become a part of a community of learners unlike any other. In our studios and galleries, you can co-create artworks with MoMA’s artists; on the streets of Midtown, explore the neighborhood with our experts; and dive deep into new concepts and new conversations with innovators and visionaries.

If you can’t make it to MoMA, we also offer both instructor-led and self-guided MoMA Courses Online. Learn more about MoMA Courses Online.


Evening Classes

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


Otherstories-t

Other Stories: Art and Politics in Eastern Europe and Latin America

Starts October 5
4 Mondays
Instructor: Agnes Berecz

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Otherstories

Other Stories provides an overview of the art and cultural production of two geopolitical regions that are frequently underrepresented in Western art-historical narratives of the 1960s and 1970s: Eastern Europe and Latin America. The class, held in conjunction with the exhibition Transmissions: Art in Eastern Europe and Latin America, 1960–1980, focuses on artists and collectives, based in Bogota, Bucharest, Budapest, Buenos Aires, Prague, Rio de Janeiro, Santiago, Warsaw, and Zagreb, whose work was characterized by conceptual and multimedia practices and strongly shaped by political concerns. Class sessions explore artists such as Geta Brặtescu, Milan Knížák, David Lamelas, Marta Minujín, and Dóra Maurer, among many others, and how they helped create transnational networks of creative experimentation.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne) is an art historian and an associate professor at Christie’s Education New York. She also teaches at Pratt Institute and lectures at The Museum of Modern Art. Her writings have appeared in Art Journal, Art in America, Artmargins, and the Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin, and in European and U.S. exhibition catalogues.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/5, 10/19, 10/26, 11/2 (No Class 10/12)
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Raad-t

Walid Raad: Politics, Narrative, and Performance

Starts October 28
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Mark Tursi

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Raad

In conjunction with the exhibition Walid Raad, this class explores two of the Lebanese artist's major projects, The Atlas Group (1989–2004) and Scratching on things I could disavow (2007–ongoing). For years, Raad has worked in a variety of mediums and genres—video, photographs, news clippings, interviews, narrative (visual and textual), sculpture, installation, and performance—to challenge the stories and representations of conflict, trauma, violence, and dramatic cultural transformation as documented and represented by the media and others in the public sphere. In particular, his work explores the way in which contemporary and historical events, especially in Lebanon, are documented, manipulated, and fabricated. He then examines how these same events are disseminated, absorbed, and assimilated—accurately or erroneously—and the impact these processes have on the individual and collective psyches of the effected populations.

The class will also make connections to work by Raad’s contemporaries on view in other exhibitions, including Ocean of Images: New Photography 2015; Transmissions: Art in Eastern Europe and Latin America, 1960–1980s; and Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern.

Mark Tursi has taught courses at MoMA on the sublime, Abstract Expressionism, Realism, Surrealism, and the artistic interchange between poets and painters. He is a professor of writing and literature at New Jersey City University, the author of three collections of poetry, and a founding editor of Apostrophe Books and the literary and visual arts journal Double Room.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/28, 11/4, 11/11, 11/18
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Moma_picasso_shegoat-t

Invention, Improvisation, and Irreverence in Pablo Picasso’s Sculpture

Starts October 19
4 Mondays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

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Moma_picasso_shegoat

During his lifetime, Pablo Picasso kept most of his sculptures in his private possession, and as a result these works are less familiar to the general public. However, these sculptures revolutionized modern sculptural practice—and modern art more broadly—with their constant reinvention of form, material, and process. Taking full advantage of MoMA’s sweeping Picasso Sculpture exhibition, as well additional works in MoMA’s collection by Picasso and others, this four-week class covers the full span of the Spanish artist's career and investigates what the endlessly renewable language of sculpture meant to Picasso and to the world.

Over the last 12 years, Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor for MoMA, teaching more than 25 in-gallery courses. Her specialty is modern European art and culture, especially that of France and Spain. She just published a catalogue essay on Agustí Puig, the contemporary Catalan artist whose work was featured in Woody Allen’s 2008 film Viki Cristina Barcelona. In recent months, Larissa has been developing content for a new immersive arts-education and technology company called Woofbert.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

8:00–9:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/19, 10/26, 11/2, 11/16 (No Class 11/9)
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Fourideas-t

Four Ideas that Changed the Way We See Art, 1950–1970

Starts October 26
4 Mondays
Instructor: Jennifer Katanic

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Fourideas

Investigate key moments in modernism that changed the way we see art today. Beginning with Joseph Kosuth’s influential text "Art after Philosophy" (1969), this class explores essential questions about the nature of art and institutions that emerged during two dynamic decades in the history of art: 1950–1970. Focusing on four big ideas—the body, assemblage, meditation, and shock—we'll develop broader and more confident approaches to looking at art. Class sessions focus on artists like Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Joseph Beuys, Jim Dine, Lee Bontecou, David Hammons, Betye Saar, and many more.

Jennifer Katanic (PhD candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) is a specialist in postwar Central European art and culture. She is a lecturer in MoMA's Department of Education and works with International Art Guides as a contemporary art educator at Art Basel Miami Beach. She has taught art history at Rutgers University and City College, New York.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/26, 11/2, 11/16, 11/23 (No Class 11/9)
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Torres_garcia-t

Joaquín Torres-García: Constructing Modernism Across the Atlantic

Starts October 29
3 Thursdays
Instructor: Lori Cole

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Torres_garcia

Drawing on the exhibition Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern, this class follows Torres-García's path from Montevideo, Uruguay, to Spain, New York, Italy, France, and back to Uruguay, considering his inventive mode of abstraction in relation to the places he lived and the artists he encountered. We survey his work chronologically, beginning with the bright paintings, toys, and ephemera he produced in Barcelona and New York, and continuing through the abstract paintings he created in the 1930s in Paris and his return to Uruguay in 1934, where he launched “Constructive Universalism”—a movement that combined modernist abstraction with ancient and pre-Columbian motifs. By analyzing Torres-García’s work alongside that of his contemporaries, the class considers how the artist shaped—and was shaped by—the development of modernism across Europe and the Americas.

Lori Cole is currently an assistant professor/faculty fellow in the Draper Program at New York University, where she teaches art history. She has also taught at the Whitney Museum of American Art and Brandeis University. Her work on the intersection of art and print culture has been published widely, and she is currently researching Joaquín Torres-García, Stuart Davis, and their related print and exhibition histories in the 1920s.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

3

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/29, 11/5, 11/12
Capacity
25
Non Member

$275

Member and Corporate Member employees

$245

Student/Educator

$180

Sound Amplification Available
Is_this_for_everyone-t

Is This for Everyone? Design Today

Starts October 29
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Michelle Fisher

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Is_this_for_everyone

Drawing upon the diverse works in MoMA’s design exhibition This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good, this class explores the ways in which contemporary design shapes and serves the world around us, for better and, sometimes, for worse. We'll consider objects ranging from 3-D-printed garments, bricks grown from mushrooms, and speculative future robots to data visualizations and graphic design icons in order to expand our understanding of what design is today—both as objects to collect, conserve, and display in the museum, and as artifacts in our everyday lives.

Michelle Millar Fisher is a curatorial assistant in MoMA's Department of Architecture and Design and a doctoral candidate in art history at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Previously, she worked at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She is a lecturer at Parsons The New School for Design, and she often teaches at The Frick Collection. She is currently at work co-editing a book on collaboration in the visual arts and architecture, called Collaboration and Its Discontents, to be published by Courtauld Books Online in 2015.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

8:00–9:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Activatingthebody-t

Activating the Body: Performance 1945 to Present

Starts October 29
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Giampaolo Bianconi

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Activatingthebody

As an art form, performance, commonly understood as a practice rooted in the artist’s physical presence or live action, has emerged as a central mode of art making since the start of the 21st century. This class, which explores how performance art and the discourse around it has evolved since the 20th century, considers questions like: How has performance developed in relation to art in other mediums, including painting, photography, and film? What are the ethics of bodies in performance? How is the history of performance framed in a museum setting? Class sessions investigate specific works by artists such as John Cage, Carolee Schneemann, and Adrian Piper, contextualizing them in their historical moments. The class incorporates visits to exhibitions and performances, including Transmissions: Art in Eastern Europe and Latin America, 1960–1980s and Walid Raad.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Icons_modernism-t

Icons of Modernism

Starts November 3
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

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Icons_modernism

What makes an artwork iconic? Whether it has a remarkable visual impact, makes a strong political statement, or has profound social implications, an iconic artwork endures in its relevance. These works warrant repeated investigation, through which we can consider the factors that impacted its creation and, in turn, how it impacted subsequent art. This class explores masterworks from MoMA's collection from new perspectives in order to understand their status as modern icons. Artists discussed include Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Joseph Beuys.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at The Museum of Modern Art.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/3, 11/10, 11/17, 12/1 (No Class 11/24)
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Newphoto-t

New Photography: Navigating an Ocean of Images

Starts November 16
4 Mondays
Instructor: David Smucker

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Newphoto

The artists featured in the exhibition Ocean of Images: New Photography 2015 investigate the changing nature of photography in what the curators call an “image-based, post-Internet reality” in which the online distribution and consumption of photographs is the norm. Artworks by the DIS collective, Katja Novitskova, and others combine analog and digital modes of photography and video, expanding beyond traditional uses of these mediums to provide new understandings of the social, political, and economic conditions of our online lives. This class explores themes presented in the exhibition, including the challenge of representing online networks, the role of pre-Internet history and politics in shaping the online world, new artistic opportunities provided by online content, and attempts to capture the emotional subtleties of social interactions in digital space.

While our primary focus will be on New Photography 2015, the exhibition Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection features many works which complement our inquiry, and the exhibition Walid Raad provides a case study of a single contemporary artist whose photo- and video-based work addresses several of the course’s key themes.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/16, 11/23, 11/30, 12/7
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Parallel_experiments-t

Parallel Experiments: Visual Art and Poetry

Starts November 16
4 Mondays
Instructor: Steven Zultanski

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Parallel_experiments

Explore the relationship between contemporary poetry and contemporary art, and the ways in which 20th-century art impacted subsequent creative writing. As with art after modernism, much poetry in the 20th century rejected traditional artistic conventions in favor of experiments with physical materials, performance, technology, and the documentary. Because of this, contemporary poetry often doesn’t look like poetry; it takes on many forms, from text objects, scripts, and personal essays to procedural exercises, conceptual provocations, or documents. Class sessions use weekly readings and the Museum’s collection and special exhibitions to make analogies between tendencies in poetry and visual art, looking at exhibitions including Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern; Walid Raad; and Transmissions: Art in Eastern Europe and Latin America, 1960–1980 and discussing poets such as Gertrude Stein, Trisha Low, Cecilia Vicuña, and Vito Acconci.

Steven Zultanski is the author of four books of poetry, most recently Bribery (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014) and Agony (Book Thug, 2012). He is co-editing the forthcoming essay collection Crude Love: Essays on Post-Conceptual Poetics (Ugly Duckling Presse: 2016). He received his MFA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and his PhD from SUNY Buffalo. His critical work has appeared in various small magazines and journals.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/16, 11/23, 11/30, 12/7
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Daytime Classes

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


Moma_picasso_shegoat-t

Invention, Improvisation, and Irreverence in Pablo Picasso’s Sculpture

Starts October 6
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

View detail
Close
Moma_picasso_shegoat

During his lifetime, Pablo Picasso kept most of his sculptures in his private possession, and as a result these works are less familiar to the general public. However, these sculptures revolutionized modern sculptural practice—and modern art more broadly—with their constant reinvention of form, material, and process. Taking full advantage of MoMA’s sweeping Picasso Sculpture exhibition, as well additional works in MoMA’s collection by Picasso and others, this four-week class covers the full span of the Spanish artist's career and investigates what the endlessly renewable language of sculpture meant to Picasso and to the world.

Over the last 12 years, Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor for MoMA, teaching more than 25 in-gallery courses. Her specialty is modern European art and culture, especially that of France and Spain. She just published a catalogue essay on Agustí Puig, the contemporary Catalan artist whose work was featured in Woody Allen’s 2008 film Viki Cristina Barcelona. In recent months, Larissa has been developing content for a new immersive arts-education and technology company called Woofbert.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/6, 10/13, 10/20, 10/27
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Duchamp-t

Modern Sculpture from Marcel Duchamp to Today

Starts October 7
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Joan Pachner

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Duchamp

What does it take to make a sculpture? This class addresses changing attitudes towards craft, subject matter, and the role of viewer participation in sculpture since Marcel Duchamp’s radical artistic provocations. Particular focus is given to artists working after 1950 who ignored barriers between mediums and prompted viewers to rethink assumptions that had been in place for centuries. Throughout the class, we explore how artists as diverse as Joseph Beuys, Lee Bontecou, Marcel Broodthaers, John Chamberlain, David Hammons, Jasper Johns, Yayoi Kusama, Robert Rauschenberg, and Franz West have expanded our understanding of three-dimensional art.

Joan Pachner (PhD New York University, Institute of Fine Arts) specializes in modern sculpture, and for the past 10 years she has lectured regularly at MoMA. She published a monograph on David Smith (Phaidon, 2013) and was a curatorial consultant and catalogue coauthor for Tony Smith: Architect, Painter, Sculpture (MoMA, 1988). She is currently working on a catalogue raisonné of Tony Smith's sculpture. In addition, she was a curatorial consultant at Storm King Art Center (1996–2005). Pachner has published and lectured on other important 20th-century sculptors, including Anthony Caro, Gaston Lachaise, Jose de Rivera, and George Segal.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Otherstories-t

Other Stories: Art and Politics in Eastern Europe and Latin America

Starts October 8
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Agnes Berecz

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Otherstories

Other Stories provides an overview of the art and cultural production of two geopolitical regions that are frequently underrepresented in Western art-historical narratives of the 1960s and 1970s: Eastern Europe and Latin America. The class, held in conjunction with the exhibition Transmissions: Art in Eastern Europe and Latin America, 1960–1980, focuses on artists and collectives, based in Bogota, Bucharest, Budapest, Buenos Aires, Prague, Rio de Janeiro, Santiago, Warsaw, and Zagreb, whose work was characterized by conceptual and multimedia practices and strongly shaped by political concerns. Class sessions explore artists such as Geta Brặtescu, Milan Knížák, David Lamelas, Marta Minujín, and Dóra Maurer, among many others, and how they helped create transnational networks of creative experimentation.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne) is an art historian and an associate professor at Christie’s Education New York. She also teaches at Pratt Institute and lectures at The Museum of Modern Art. Her writings have appeared in Art Journal, Art in America, Artmargins, and the Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin, and in European and U.S. exhibition catalogues.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Fourideas-t

Four Ideas that Changed the Way We See Art, 1950–1970

Starts November 3
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Jennifer Katanic

View detail
Close
Fourideas

Investigate key moments in modernism that changed the way we see art today. Beginning with Joseph Kosuth’s influential text "Art after Philosophy" (1969), this class explores essential questions about the nature of art and institutions that emerged during two dynamic decades in the history of art: 1950–1970. Focusing on four big ideas—the body, assemblage, meditation, and shock—we'll develop broader and more confident approaches to looking at art. Class sessions focus on artists like Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Joseph Beuys, Jim Dine, Lee Bontecou, David Hammons, Betye Saar, and many more.

Jennifer Katanic (PhD candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) is a specialist in postwar Central European art and culture. She is a lecturer in MoMA's Department of Education and works with International Art Guides as a contemporary art educator at Art Basel Miami Beach. She has taught art history at Rutgers University and City College, New York.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/3, 11/10, 11/17, 12/1 (No Class 11/24)
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Icons_modernism-t

Icons of Modernism

Starts November 4
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

View detail
Close
Icons_modernism

What makes an artwork iconic? Whether it has a remarkable visual impact, makes a strong political statement, or has profound social implications, an iconic artwork endures in its relevance. These works warrant repeated investigation, through which we can consider the factors that impacted its creation and, in turn, how it impacted subsequent art. This class explores masterworks from MoMA's collection from new perspectives in order to understand their status as modern icons. Artists discussed include Jackson Pollock, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Joseph Beuys.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at The Museum of Modern Art.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

10:00 a.m.–11:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/4, 11/11, 11/18, 12/2 (No Class 11/25)
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Newphoto-t

New Photography: Navigating an Ocean of Images

Starts November 16
4 Mondays
Instructor: David Smucker

View detail
Close
Newphoto

The artists featured in the exhibition Ocean of Images: New Photography 2015 investigate the changing nature of photography in what the curators call an “image-based, post-Internet reality” in which the online distribution and consumption of photographs is the norm. Artworks by the DIS collective, Katja Novitskova, and others combine analog and digital modes of photography and video, expanding beyond traditional uses of these mediums to provide new understandings of the social, political, and economic conditions of our online lives. This class explores themes presented in the exhibition, including the challenge of representing online networks, the role of pre-Internet history and politics in shaping the online world, new artistic opportunities provided by online content, and attempts to capture the emotional subtleties of social interactions in digital space.

While our primary focus will be on New Photography 2015, the exhibition Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection features many works which complement our inquiry, and the exhibition Walid Raad provides a case study of a single contemporary artist whose photo- and video-based work addresses several of the course’s key themes.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/16, 11/23, 11/30, 12/7
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Studio Immersions

Make art in collaboration with contemporary artists.


Buildingblocks-t

Building Blocks: Design Experiments and the Natural World

Starts October 13
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Anette Millington

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Buildingblocks

How are designers inspired by the natural world? How do designers use organic processes and materials to innovate? This class is guided by these questions and close discussion of objects and ideas featured in the exhibition This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good and other collection installations—and inspiration gained in the galleries will be brought back into the studio. Class conversations are paired with studio-based design projects focusing on wearable design, products, and environments. All projects call for play, collaboration, and problem solving as we use nature as inspiration for design for the common good.

Anette Millington is an artist who works with surface design, textiles, and fibers. She earned an MFA from the School of Visual Arts and received a BFA from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. She has worked in museum education at the Brooklyn Museum, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and The Museum of Modern Art. She is currently an assistant professor at Parsons The New School for Design, where she teaches integrated design studio courses and is involved in several curricular initiatives investigating learning and the design process.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
10/13, 10/20, 10/27, 11/3
Capacity
12
Non Member

$450

Member

$365

Student/Educator:

$310

Sound Amplification Available
Pushpull_picasso-t

Push/Pull: Material Practices and Pablo Picasso's Sculpture

Starts October 14
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Kerry Downey

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Pushpull_picasso

Inspired by the exhibition Picasso Sculpture, this hands-on studio class is driven by experimentation and creative play. While Pablo Picasso was formally trained in painting, he was a self-taught sculptor; in this class, we approach simple, everyday materials as Picasso did, with the curiosity of the untrained artist. In order to explore questions such as, “what inaugurates freedom of expression?” and “how do artists come to feel this so-called freedom that is often taken for granted or seen as a given?,” this workshop offers a series of activities that loosen inhibitions and generate ideas rapidly, while simultaneously introducing key sculptural concepts such as form, positive and negative space, line, plane, and surface. With a strong emphasis on process, we will seek new ways of thinking by using basic materials such as scrap wood, wire, and cardboard, challenging aesthetic boundaries, emphasizing discovery, and embracing uncertainty. No previous experience is necessary.

Kerry Downey is an interdisciplinary teaching artist with an MFA from Hunter College and a BA from Bard College. She has been teaching at MoMA for eight years and has recently taught at Parsons The New School for Design and Hunter College. Her art has been exhibited at The Drawing Center, the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Invisible Dog, A.I.R. gallery, Franklin Street Works, and REVERSE gallery, where her work was an ARTforum “Critic’s Pick.” She has been an artist-in-residence at the Vermont Studio Center, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, and Real Time and Space.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4
Capacity
12
Non Member

$450

Member

$365

Student/Educator:

$310

Sound Amplification Available
Raad_truthordare-t

Truth or Dare: Walid Raad's Art and Storytelling as Performance

October 17
1 Saturday
Instructor: Kerry Downey

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Raad_truthordare

Using Walid Raad’s various artistic practices, from photography to performance, as lenses into the myriad ways stories get told today, this one-day workshop probes questions such as: How do we know if the histories that we hear about our lives, both personal and political, are real? How do you tell your life story? Do you pull out a photo album or whisper it in the dark? Making use of dialogue, interactive games, and documentary strategies, participants investigate the nature of “truth.” Are there multiple forms of truth, different types of honesty, and varying ways to understand the world based on received information? Taking cues from Raad’s interest in—and skepticism of—sociopolitical histories, this workshop invites participants to reconsider and reimagine acts of listening and looking. In conjunction with the exhibition Walid Raad.

Kerry Downey is an interdisciplinary teaching artist with an MFA from Hunter College and a BA from Bard College. She has been teaching at MoMA for eight years and has recently taught at Parsons The New School for Design and Hunter College. Her art has been exhibited at The Drawing Center, the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Invisible Dog, A.I.R. gallery, Franklin Street Works, and REVERSE gallery, where her work was an ARTforum “Critic’s Pick.” She has been an artist-in-residence at the Vermont Studio Center, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, and Real Time and Space.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Schedule
10/17
Capacity
12
Non Member

$80

Member

$60

Student/Educator:

$40

Sound Amplification Available
After Hours

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MoMA After Hours: Making Music Modern

March 19
1 Thursday
Instructor: Marianne Eggler

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What do Arnold Schӧenberg and the Talking Heads have in common? The dynamic intersection of music and the visual arts. In the early 20th century, the fruitful interplay between music and visual art contributed to the move toward abstraction in fine art painting and commercial art. This dialogue across disciplines reemerged in the album covers of the new wave. Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers of the later twentieth century.

Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers and explore the current exhibition Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye. This MoMA After Hours event includes a visit to the exhibition followed by a discussion and a visit to the downtown music haunt Pianos for a nightcap. Refreshments will be served throughout the evening.

Please note: you must be 21 years or older to register for this class.

This class is also offered on Thursday, March 22

Marianne Eggler is an art, architecture, and design historian who has served as a MoMA lecturer since 1998. A native New Yorker, she holds a BA in art history from the University of Rochester and did her doctoral studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation on Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich's modern domestic interiors. She has lectured both here and abroad on the subject of modern art and design and has taught extensively, both for MoMA courses and at various other institutions, including Parsons The New School for Design, CUNY, and SUNY Buffalo State. She is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/19
Non Member

$100

Refreshments included

Member and Corporate Member employees

$80

Refreshments included

Student/Educator

$60

Refreshments included

Sound Amplification Available
Artist-Led

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Painting with Sound: An Introduction to Audio Reactive Programming

SOLD OUT

Starts March 28
1 Saturday, 1 Sunday
Instructor: Joshua Davis

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Join artist Joshua Davis for a two-day workshop in creating visualizations of sound. Students will use JAVA+HYPE software to paint objects onscreen and then expose them to a range of audio input. By assigning a range of form and color to the deepest bass and the highest tweets, the students will create art that responds to the invisible audio world that surrounds us. This program is open to all levels and no prior skills are required.

Joshua Davis is an American designer, technologist, author, and artist. Over his 19-year career as an image maker using programming, Davis has written his own code to produce interactions with users and generate visual compositions according to rule-based, randomized processes. Davis had a role in designing the visualization of IBM’s Watson, the intelligent computer program capable of answering questions, for the quiz show Jeopardy. His work is in the collection of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, and was exhibited in Design Life Now, the National Design Triennial 2006.

Day

Saturday, Sunday

Sessions

2

Time

1:00–5:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/28, 3/29
Non Member

$75

Member and Corporate Member employees

$50

Student/Educator

$40

Sound Amplification Available
Frequently Asked Questions


Payment

We accept all major credit cards. To register and pay visit the online registration system.

Discount

Students, educators (K–12, college, and university), and staff of other museums receive a discount on the member rate. Student or staff identification must be presented upon check-in on the first day of class.

Refunds

In order to receive a full refund, notice of cancellation must be sent in writing via e-mail, letter, or fax at least one week before the first scheduled day of class. Payment will not be refunded after this time. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.


If I drop the class can I get a refund?
You will only receive a refund if you cancel your registration at least one week before the first day of class. You may do this by accessing your online registration and clicking the "Modify" tab. You will be able to unregister yourself from a class and receive a full refund. You may also cancel your registration by phone or e-mail. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.

Can I get a refund after the second or third class?
MoMA is unable to grant refunds after the refund period.

If I miss a class can I receive a refund or a make up classes with the instructor?
No. MoMA provides course schedules in advance to provide perspective students the opportunity to plan ahead and make necessary arrangements to attend classes. Students will receive a syllabus and course reader in advance to help themselves prepare for missing class.

Can I take a MoMA Class for credit?
No. MoMA Classes are not accredited. If you wish to receive credit for a MoMA Class, you must organize this with your institution.

How do I register?
To register for online courses, use the online registration system.

Do I have to register online?
Yes. If you have any difficulties using the online registration system, please call (212) 408-8441.

How do I know if a class is full?
If a class is full the website will indicate that the course is sold out. Please note that updates to class availability are made during business hours and courses may fill up overnight or over the weekend. You will know a course is sold out when you attempt to register and the only option you are given is to add your name to the waiting list.

Can I be put on a waiting list for a class that is filled?
Yes. The online registration form includes a waiting list option for sold-out classes. You must fill out the online registration form to be added to the waiting list. Once you complete the registration, you will receive an e-mail confirming that you have been added to the waiting list.

What if I am a member of the Museum?
As a member at the individual level or higher you will receive the members rate. We honor a first-come, first-served policy for class registration regardless of your member status.

How do I sign up for a membership?
If you are not a member and would like to sign up for membership, simply visit the Membership page. If you have any questions about membership, please call Membership Services at (212) 708-9475.

Are Corporate Member employees eligible to receive the member discount?
Yes. A copy of your valid company ID must be faxed or e-mailed to the Corporate Membership Department in order to receive the discounted price.

Will the class have access to the galleries?
When possible, as determined by your instructor and MoMA, students will have the unique privilege to view MoMA's collection in the galleries after hours, during class time.

Will these specific courses be offered again?
Yes and no. There are some courses that will be offered regularly, for example Modern Art 1880–1945 and Modern and Contemporary Art 1945–Present. Some classes may be offered again depending on the instructor's availability, scheduling, and student interest. MoMA cannot guarantee if or when certain classes will be offered again.

If I miss a class and there is another section of the same class being offered on a different day, can I attend the other section of the same course?
No. Each course instructor utilizes a different syllabus. Although there are two sections of the same class offered, the material covered would not necessarily correspond.

Can I register my friend?
Yes. Once you have entered your personal information and selected a class in the online registration form, click the "Add Person" button. Fill out the registration form for this person and be sure to use a separate e-mail address for him or her. Our registration system will not accept multiple registrants with the same e-mail address. Your registration is complete after you have filled out all the required information for both you and your friend and submitted payment. Please note that you will each receive an e-mail confirming your individual registration. Your confirmation e-mail will NOT include a record of your friend's registration information.

Can I bring a friend or family member to attend one of my class sessions so they can experience the program?
No. Though we welcome interest in MoMA Classes, we cannot accommodate guests.


Policies

MoMA reserves the right to cancel or withdraw classes, to change class curricula and scheduling, and to withdraw and substitute instructors.

If an instructor needs to cancel an individual class, we will notify you via phone or e-mail and that class will be made up at a later date.

Students accept full responsibility for personal injury and/or losses suffered during class hours and while on museum premises.

MoMA will not release course participants’ personal information to any persons or organizations outside of the Museum without prior written consent.