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February 15, 2011  |  Counter Space
Eat, Drink, (Read!) MoMA

Roberto Sambonet (Italian, 1924–1995). Center Line Set of Cookware. 1964. Stainless steel. Manufactured by Sambonet S.p.A., Vercelli, Italy. Gift of the manufacturer, 1972

Several exciting things are happening now in the world of Counter Space—time for an update!

First, the exhibition has been extended, and we’re so glad it will endure with us through the winter. The closing date is now May 2, so you have lots more time to come visit if you haven’t already, or to come again at your leisure—no need for frenzy.

Looking for an appropriate (and filling) way to celebrate this good news? Our second announcement is a special event happening this Thursday evening called Eat, Drink, MoMA. Chef Michael Romano is joining our friend, chef Lynn Bound, to present an amazing three-course gourmet Italian dinner at Cafe 2, accompanied by a gallery talk and cocktail reception. It’s a wonderful chance to celebrate the Italian design featured in the exhibition—from Bialetti’s Moka Express (c. 1930) to Gino Colombini’s kitchen pail (1957), Snaidero’s mobile kitchen (1968), and Marco Zanuso’s kitchen scale (1969). Tickets are still available, and Juliet Kinchin and I will certainly be there!

Finally, we are proud to report that our Counter Space book is now available! Starting with the familiar cover image, this book captures the highlights of the exhibition, echoing the multidisciplinary reach of the show. Architecture and design (including the Frankfurt Kitchen) are complemented by photography, drawingspaintings, sculpture, and film stills—all from MoMA’s collection. It’s a must-read for kitchen enthusiasts, not to mention an awesome gift…

Here's the cover of our Counter Space book, which was beautifully designed by Triboro. Check it out!

Comments

It is wonderfully refreshing to find a large audience responding positively to thoughtful design that is practical as well as attractive. “Form follows function” has been resurrected, and let’s hope it will be appreciated once again as it should be. Thank you.

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