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TAG: WHAT IS A PRINT?

Posts tagged ‘What Is a Print?’
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What Is a Print? An Interactive Website is Now a Book

Cover of What is a Print? publication

What Is a Print? (2011), by Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator in the Department of Prints and Illustrated Books, is a publication that grew out of The Museum of Modern Art’s interactive website of the same name. Read more

April 2, 2010  |  Picasso: Themes and Variations, Tech
Prints and the Web—Introducing Picasso: Themes and Variations
Picasso Prints

Screenshot of the Picasso: Themes and Variations website

When you think about printmaking, the Web may not be the first thing that comes to mind. You may envision instead old etching presses, or heavy lithographic stones, or stacks of paper waiting to hit the press. But in fact, MoMA’s Prints Department has long been interested in using the Web as a way of sharing information: using animated, interactive multimedia components as a way to make the material come alive. Our online projects are all available on MoMA.org, from our earliest experiments all the way back in 1998 with Miró’s Black and Red SeriesRead more

December 10, 2009  |  Artists, Picasso: Themes and Variations
Picasso on Rembrandt

Pablo Picasso. After Rembrandt: Ecce Homo. 1970, published 1978.

Pablo Picasso. After Rembrandt: Ecce Homo. 1970, published 1978. Etching and aquatint. The Museum of Modern Art. The Edgar Wachenheim III Fund, 2009. © 2009 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

There are lots of reasons why a work might be acquired for MoMA’s collection. Sometimes, the intense preparations for an upcoming exhibition provide a great opportunity to step back, take a careful look at what we already have, and see if there are gaps that need to be filled in our holdings of an artist’s work. This was recently the case as we researched an upcoming exhibition that, along with an accompanying catalogue and website, will explore Pablo Picasso’s creative process through the lens of printmaking. We took a close look at MoMA’s Picasso prints by theme, by technique, and by chronology, and discovered that we didn’t have a strong enough representation of Picasso’s late period (from about 1965 to his death in 1973), which has often been overlooked and underappreciated. Read more