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TAG: SOVIET FILM

Posts tagged ‘Soviet film’
April 27, 2010  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Vsevolod I. Pudovkin
Storm over Asia. 1928. USSR. Directed by V. I. Pudovkin

Storm over Asia. 1928. USSR. Directed by V. I. Pudovkin

These notes accompany the Vsevolod I. Pudovkin program, screening April 28, 29, and 30 in Theater 3.

Vsevolod Illarionovitch Pudovkin (1893–1953) was, like Sergei Eisenstein, a pupil of Lev Kuleshov (1899–1970), and all three of them were heavily influenced by the work of D. W. Griffith, particularly his mastery of editing. All three also wrote copiously on film theory, finding intellectual justification for the choices they made in creating their movies. Few American filmmakers made much effort to convey their thought processes, and most seemed happy to leave the impression that their work was largely intuitive. When Peter Bogdanovich asked John Ford how he did a particular shot, Ford replied soberly, “With a camera.” Read more

March 2, 2010  |  An Auteurist History of Film
An Eisenstein Double Bill
Battleship Potemkin. 1925. USSR. Directed by Sergei Eisenstein

Battleship Potemkin. 1925. USSR. Directed by Sergei Eisenstein

These notes accompany the Eisenstein Double Bill program, which screens on March 3, 4, and 5 in Theater 3.

Sergei Eisenstein (1898–1948) is a special case in many ways. He was undeniably one of the geniuses of the early cinema. As a theoretician, he wrote voluminously, positing his theory of montage (editing), derived from the work of D. W. Griffith (most notably from Intolerance). Eisenstein’s theory, which directly contradicted the German Expressionist approach most successfully promulgated by F. W. Murnau, was enormously influential on countless directors, although it did not always produce satisfactory results. Read more