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TAG: MoMA TEENS

Posts tagged ‘MoMA Teens’
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As We Approach the End…Where to Begin? Thoughts on a Strange and Experimental Season
Taking an ax to a sculptural object on the first day of Destroy Everything. All photos by Calder Zwicky

Taking an ax to a sculptural object on the first day of Destroy Everything. All photos by Kaitlyn Stubbs

Where do you start when describing this past season of MoMA’s In the Making program, offering free art and technology courses to an ever-evolving community of NYC high school students each spring and summer? We could begin with the first day of classes, perhaps, when the hundred or so new participants make their way to the Museum for the first studio session, many walking through our doors for the first time ever. The young artists in Destroy Everything: Tearing Things Down & Building Things Up began the season with a very appropriate introduction to their theme. Read more

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February 10, 2015  |  Events & Programs
Comedy for Laughs Is Not Interesting: Dave Kneebone on Art, Humor, and Keeping Things Uncomfortable
Dave Kneebone in his Abso Lutely production offices. Photo by Aaron Wojack

Dave Kneebone in the Abso Lutely production offices in Los Angeles. Photo by Aaron Wojack

As the person who oversees the creation of MoMA’s teen-created, teen-directed online art courses, I have always been interested in the visual language of contemporary short-form videos—the look and feel of the TV shows and Web series that our audiences are looking at and talking about on their own time. When we work with our teens to create their videos, we almost invariably end up making comedic pieces—not straightforward sitcom-styled comedy but a more complicated, deliberately awkward, absurdist kind of abstract humor. Read more

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August 27, 2014  |  Family & Kids, Learning and Engagement
Psychedelic Acceptance Hotel and the Rainbow on Pluto: MoMA Teens x Babycastles

This summer’s In the Making program brought an incredibly diverse group of over 85 NYC teens into contact with a range of artists and arts organizations, for a series of six-week intensive art programs. Perhaps our most ambitious project ever, this summer’s collaboration with  Babycastles, a non-profit video game-based gallery and arts collective, saw 23 teens working together on the creation of a fully-functional arcade, mural, and sculptural art installation. Read more

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August 21, 2014  |  Family & Kids, Learning and Engagement
Trance-scendence: MoMA Teens Explore Hypnotism and Performance Art

Even after years of creating weird and off-kilter art courses for teens, one of the darkest and strangest teen art courses we’ve ever offered might very well be last season’s Under the Spell of Mysterious Forces: Magic, Illusion, and Performance Based Art. Taking the young participants deep into a realm where magic, trance, and extrasensory perception mingle with performance art, the course attracted a range of curious open-minded teens, all wiling to take the plunge into the artistic unknown. Read more

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April 4, 2014  |  MoMA Teen Takeover
MoMA Teens Take Over Inside/Out: Nyssa Frank + The Living Gallery
Nyssa Frank

Nyssa Frank, founder of The Living Gallery

Coming from the Bronx and living a regular public school kid’s life, I didn’t realize the opportunities around me. I had witnessed my brother for years get cool things off Craigslist. I mean, he even bought a car. I was hungry to enter the art world. I wanted to dip my feet into anything I could. Read more

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April 4, 2014  |  MoMA Teen Takeover
MoMA Teens Take Over Inside/Out: Karni Krikoryan, Artist
Portrait of Ringo Starr, by Karni Krikoryan

Portrait of Ringo Starr, by Karni Krikoryan

Karni Krikoryan is an artist born in Istanbul and currently living in the United Kingdom. She is also my aunt. Starting only at age five, she began creating art. “I had something to say about everything around me. So my eyes became my words,” is how she explains her early interest. Read more

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April 3, 2014  |  MoMA Teen Takeover
MoMA Teens Take Over Inside/Out: Edible Masterpieces

Growing up in New York City has taught me to always pay attention to my surroundings, as well as to be an open-minded individual. It is a cultural melting pot and an artistic wonderland with an abundance of galleries, museums, graffiti, posters, and people. Read more

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April 3, 2014  |  MoMA Teen Takeover
MoMA Teens Take Over Inside/Out: Capturing the Mona Lisa…Without Ever Seeing It
The crowds surrounding the Mona Lisa. Photo credit Ana Inciardi

The crowds surrounding the Mona Lisa, Louvre Museum, Paris. Photo by Ana Inciardi

People shuffle around the gallery next to priceless pieces of art. Why are they here? Phones brought them here. The motive in going to a museum nowadays has evolved. The camera not only captures the piece of art, but also the wandering aesthete who clutches the camera at an arm’s length away from his or her face. Read more

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April 3, 2014  |  MoMA Teen Takeover
MoMA Teens Take Over Inside/Out: A Collection of Poems + Poets
Jackson Pollock. <i>Number 1A, 1948</i>. 1948. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 68" x 8' 8" (172.7 x 264.2 cm). Purchase. © 2014 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The inspiration for at least three poems: Jackson Pollock. Number 1A, 1948. 1948. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 68″ x 8′ 8″ (172.7 x 264.2 cm). Purchase. © 2014 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

“Hi! So we’re from a program at MoMA called the Cross-Museum Collective and we’ve been asking people to write spontaneous poems about the piece of artwork that they’re currently looking at for the MoMA blog. Would you want to write one for us?” Read more

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April 2, 2014  |  MoMA Teen Takeover
MoMA Teens Take Over Inside/Out: Skeletons, Daggers, and Snakes

Every family has its quirks, and you could say that my family wears theirs on their sleeves. I grew up surrounded by tattooed arms—skeletons, hearts, daggers, and snakes. Read more