A-|A+

MoMA

TAG: MoMA

Posts tagged ‘MoMA’
Profileairflow_cri_2408322-150x150
On Loan: Claes Oldenburg’s Profile Airflow

MoMA is one of a network of museums in New York City and around the globe that often collaborate and support one another to facilitate scholarly and engaging exhibitions. One way that we do this is by loaning artworks to other institutions. Read more

Teens_2011_102_mseck_300res_cc-e1333490677813-150x150
April 11, 2012  |  Events & Programs, Family & Kids
Come Out and Play: Material Bingo and Games for Learning

Games are a hot topic in museums at the moment. Yet the intersection between art and games is old news. From Marcel Duchamp’s chess obsession to Surrealist parlor games in the 1920s (see: Exquisite Corpse), to more contemporary projects Read more

January 20, 2010  |  Bauhaus, Events & Programs
Lessons from the Bauhaus
Eugen Batz.  Exercise for color-theory course taught by Vasily Kandinsky.  1929-30. Tempera over pencil on black paper. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin

Eugen Batz. Exercise for color-theory course taught by Vasily Kandinsky. 1929–30. Tempera over pencil on black paper. Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin

The exhibition Bauhaus 1919–1933: Workshops for Modernity finally comes to an end next week. As a final event of the various public programs we have offered in conjunction with the exhibition, we will present a symposium this Friday, January 22, entitled Before and After 1933: The International Legacy of the Bauhaus. The event will bring together a vast array of international scholars to talk about the remarkable diaspora of Bauhaus intellectuals that, following the school’s closing in 1933, spread throughout various parts of Europe, the Americas, and even Africa, contributing to the establishment of a modern design style and branching out into various pedagogical models and practices that to this day lie at the core of the curricula of art and design schools worldwide.

Here at MoMA—both among staff members and those who came to the related public programs and workshops—we are also left with plenty of food for thought regarding the enduring legacy of that famous school. Read more

January 18, 2010  |  Events & Programs
Behind the Frame: Picasso, Barack, and Me

Pablo Picasso. Vallauris Exposition 1955 (1955 Exposition de Vallauris). 1955. Linoleum cut, 26 x 21 1/8" (66 x 53.7 cm), sheet: 35 1/4 x 23 3/8" (89.5 x 59.4 cm). Printer: Arnéra. Publisher: Arnéra. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kramer Collection, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kramer. © 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

A few months back I was perusing The New York Times when I was stopped in my tracks by a picture of Barack Obama in his office at the University of Chicago. Being a former Second City citizen, I immediately felt a sense of kinship of place, but I was even more astonished to see hanging in his office the exact same Picasso print—a black and white devil-like image, a poster for 1955 Exposition de Vallauris—that  hangs on the wall of my living room. I always look around people’s homes and offices for signs of who they are and what choices they make, but when I saw that Picasso work, I knew that Barack and I clearly had affinities! Not everyone makes the same choices or likes the same things—but we chose the same image to look at day in and day out. What did that say about us?

I had bought that print, probably not a “real” print, when I was seventeen years old. Pablo Picasso was perhaps my first real love. Growing up in Niagara Falls, Canada, where there is a wax museum literally on every corner (no wonder I ended up in this line of work!), I first met Picasso at the public library. The art section of the Dewey Decimal system was like my private zip code. I remember finding book about Picasso and Gertrude Stein and falling into a deep, deep swoon. I imagined myself living the salon life, with every conversation, morsel of food, or flirtation the catalyst for a painting or poem. My paintings, made late in the night, the only time an artist can work (teen or not), were inflected with Picasso’s lines, colors, and passions. Picasso sustained me through my teenage years. However, as I was indoctrinated into the art world of the mid-1970s during art school, I quickly came to realize that not only was my Picasso-influenced work not cool, but that he didn’t wear very well. I secretly pined in front of Guernica for my lost love during the obligatory visit to MoMA with my fellow students and professors. Read more

January 1, 2010
Happy New Year
Andreas Gursky. New Year's Day Swimmers. 1988

Andreas Gursky. New Year's Day Swimmers. 1988

As we ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter- and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.

December 31, 2009
2010 – One Day Left

As we prepare to ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter- and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.

Tod Papageorge. New Years Eve at Studio 54. 1978

Tod Papageorge. New Year's Eve at Studio 54. 1978

December 30, 2009
2010 – Two Days Left
Wes Wilson (Robert Wesley Wilson). New Year Bash. 1966

Wes Wilson (Robert Wesley Wilson). New Year Bash. 1966

As we prepare to ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter- and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.

December 29, 2009
2010 – Three Days Left

As we prepare to ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter– and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.

The Magnificent Ambersons. 1942. USA. Directed by Orson Welles. Shown: Tim Holt (as George) and Anne Baxter (as Lucy). RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. Image ©1942 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.

The Magnificent Ambersons. 1942. USA. Directed by Orson Welles. Shown: Tim Holt (as George) and Anne Baxter (as Lucy). RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. Image ©1942 RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.

December 28, 2009
2010 – Four Days Left

As we prepare to ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter- and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.

Marcel Duchamp. In Advance of the Broken Arm. 1964 (fourth version, after lost original of November 1915)

Marcel Duchamp. In Advance of the Broken Arm. 1964 (fourth version, after lost original of November 1915)

December 25, 2009
Let It Snow

As we prepare to ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter- and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.

Wilson A. Bentley. Snowflake. 1905

Wilson A. Bentley. Snowflake. 1905