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TAG: LITHOGRAPH

Posts tagged ‘lithograph’
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September 23, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions, Publications
Toulouse-Lautrec’s Portraits of Paris: “I don’t detail you. I totalize you!”

Cover of the publication The Paris of Youlouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from The Museum of Modern Art, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Cover of the publication The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from The Museum of Modern Art, published by The Museum of Modern Art

“The Moulin Rouge hired the most famous dancers to perform the quadrille naturaliste (cancan), which delighted spectators with its swish of petticoats and flashing flesh as legs flew high—knickers optional,” writes Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator in the Department of Drawings and Prints, in The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition catalogue brilliantly chronicles the short life and career of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and the Parisian fin-de-siècle world he depicted. Suzuki creates a vivid portrait of the various elements of Lautrec’s life: the world of cafés, nightclubs, and the theater; women of the upper and lower classes; artists and writers; the culture of belle époque Paris. The catalogue accompanies the exhibition The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters, which features, almost exclusively, work from MoMA’s collection.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Miss Eglantine's Troupe (La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine). 1896. Lithograph. Sheet: 24 1/4 x 31 1/4" (61.6 x 79.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Miss Eglantine’s Troupe (La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine). 1896. Lithograph. Sheet: 24 1/4 x 31 1/4″ (61.6 x 79.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

Born to aristocratic parents who were first cousins, Toulouse-Lautrec was afflicted with genetic abnormalities. He stopped growing in his early teens at the height of four feet, 11 inches, and as he continued to mature, the growth of his nose and lips outpaced that of his face, causing drooling, lisping, and sinus troubles. Physically unfit for many of the social and sporting elements central to aristocratic life, Toulouse-Lautrec moved to Paris to study art, where he pursued both his creative and social life with vigor. He spent his days working on painting and lithography, and his absinthe-fueled nights at the opera, theaters, cafés, or nightclubs. His life and work merged; he became a chronicler of the Montmartre scenes he frequented.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Aristide Bruant in his Cabaret (Aristide Bruant dans son cabaret). 1893. Lithograph. Sheet: 53 3/4 x 37 15/16" (136 x 96.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Emilio Sanchez

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Aristide Bruant in his Cabaret (Aristide Bruant dans son cabaret). 1893. Lithograph, sheet: 53 3/4 x 37 15/16″ (136 x 96.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Emilio Sanchez

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Seated Clowness (Mademoiselle Cha-u-ka-o) (La Clownesse assise) from Elles. 1896. Sheet: 20 7/8 × 15 13/16" (53 × 40.2 cm).  One from a portfolio of twelve lithographs. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Seated Clowness (Mademoiselle Cha-u-ka-o) (La Clownesse assise) from Elles. 1896. One from a portfolio of twelve lithographs, sheet: 20 7/8 × 15 13/16″ (53 × 40.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

Suzuki describes Toulouse-Lautrec’s subjects as “resoundingly populist.” She writes, “Toulouse-Lautrec was a nightly visitor to the theater, the circus, and the opera, finding tremendous freedom and inspiration in those milieus.” Toulouse-Lautrec portrayed the performers he adored, like “The Clowness,” Mademoiselle Cha-u-ka-o, a nightclub entertainer.

An 1893 lithograph shows Toulouse-Lautrec’s friend Aristide Bruant, the proprietor of the Mirliton—a Montmartre café. Although Bruant is shown in profile, his back to the viewer, contemporaries would have immediately recognized his large felt hat and velvet coat; the portrait rests on social signifiers rather than on faithful depiction. Suzuki explains that Toulouse-Lautrec “used the low-cut dress of La Goulue, the high-stepping posture of Jane Avril, the gloves of Yvette Guilbert, and the profile of Valentin, rather than traditional portrait likenesses. Toulouse-Lautrec himself was quoted telling Guilbert, ‘Ma chere, I don’t detail you. I totalize you!’”

Using MoMA’s extensive collection of Toulouse-Lautrec’s prints, posters, journals, songs sheets, theatre programs, and illustrated books as her inspiration, Suzuki paints a portrait of an artist whose unique biography, persona, and taste is clearly reflected in his art. She places Toulouse-Lautrec squarely in and of his historical milieu, positing that his work might be seen as a visual distillation of the spirit of the Parisian belle époque.

Don’t miss the exhibition, on view at MoMA now through March 22, 2015. To learn more about Toulouse-Lautrec, download a free preview of the catalogue, or visit MoMAStore.org to purchase the book.

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August 14, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
A Window into MoMA’s Collection of Parisian Avant-Garde Theater Programs

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) was a modern chronicler of Belle Époque Paris. Entrenched in Montmartre life, Lautrec eagerly recorded the late 19th-century dance halls, cabarets, and restaurants integral to his social life with honesty, humor, and liveliness. One of his favorite forms of entertainment was the theater; Read more

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January 2, 2014  |  Collection & Exhibitions
In a Glance: Jorinde Voigt’s Gardens of Pleasure Print Series
Jorinde Voigt. 3 Views GREEN. Games of Love; "Autumn flowers", "Face to face"; from the album "Gardens of Pleasure," China 17th century. Countdown/ Countup in Sek.; Himmelsrichtung N-S; Windrichtung/ Windstärke; Deklination Rotationsrichtung/ Umdrehungen pro Tag. 2011. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Prints and Illustrated Books Fund

Jorinde Voigt. 3 Views GREEN. Games of Love; “Autumn flowers”, “Face to face”; from the album “Gardens of Pleasure,” China 17th century. Countdown/ Countup in Sek.; Himmelsrichtung N-S; Windrichtung/ Windstärke; Deklination Rotationsrichtung/ Umdrehungen pro Tag. 2011. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Prints and Illustrated Books Fund

One might be surprised to learn that the source material for Jorinde Voigt’s 2011 Gardens of Pleasure—a series of five lithographs with ink additions published by Helga Maria Klosterfelde Edition—is in fact 17th-century Chinese erotic art. Read more

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MoMA Celebrates 1913: Ludwig Hohlwein’s Schiess-Dusseldorf Poster

MoMA’s celebration of the landmark year 1913 continues with the 20th installment in our series of videos highlighting important works from 1913 in the Museum’s collection. Read more

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MoMA Celebrates 1913: Louis Raemaekers’s Tegen de Tariefwet, Vliegt niet in’t Web!

MoMA’s celebration of the landmark year 1913 continues with the 16th installment in our series of videos highlighting important works from 1913 in the Museum’s collection. Read more

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September 18, 2013  |  1913 Centennial Celebration, Videos
MoMA Celebrates 1913: Ludwig Hohlwein’s Kaffee Hag

MoMA’s celebration of the landmark year 1913 continues with the 14th installment in our series of videos highlighting important works from 1913 in the Museum’s collection. Read more