A-|A+

MoMA

TAG: KEITH HARING

Posts tagged ‘Keith Haring’
Andy-warhol-campbells-soup-can-bandana-150x150
May 1, 2014  |  Artists, MoMA Stores
Now Available at the MoMA Stores: UNIQLO at MoMA Art-Inspired Accessories

UNIQLO has had a long and fruitful relationship with MoMA, and through UNIQLO Free Friday Nights has helped advance the Museum’s mission by making art and design accessible to everyone. To celebrate its continued support of MoMA, this spring UNIQLO unveiled UNIQLO at MoMA, an assortment of T-shirts, tote bags, bandanas, and socks that feature artwork by world-renowned artists, including Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Jackson Pollock, and Ryan McGinness. Read more

The-moma-design-store-windows-featuring-the-ligne-blanche-paris-suite1-150x150
February 21, 2014  |  Artists, MoMA Stores
The MoMA Stores Debut Designs by Contemporary Artists
The MoMA Design Store windows at West 53rd Street, featuring TK. Photo: Scott Rudd

The MoMA Design Store windows at West 53rd Street, featuring plates by contemporary artists. Photo: Scott Rudd

In the second installment of Inside/Out’s spotlight on our new series of artist-produced housewares, the MoMA Design Store is excited to debut a suite of candles and Limoges porcelain collectible trays and plates with Ligne Blanche Paris. The collaboration was spearheaded by The MoMA Design Store’s Director of Merchandising Emmanuel Plat and Ligne Blanche Paris Founder Pierre Pelegry, and launched last week at the MoMA Stores. Read more

495_1992_a-b_vw3_ricr-150x150
February 16, 2012  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
A Few More Ways of Looking at a Keith Haring

Keith Haring. Untitled. 1982. Ink on two sheets of paper, sheet: 72 x 671 1/2" (182.9 x 1705.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the Estate of Keith Haring, Inc. © 2012 The Keith Haring Foundation

The monumental 1982 Keith Haring drawing Untitled is not often on view, so its inclusion in the Museum’s current installation Contemporary Galleries: 1980–Now seems like an ideal opportunity to think about how this artist’s iconic visual language fits into the larger story of 20th-century art. Read more