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CATEGORY: INTERN CHRONICLES

Posts tagged ‘Intern Chronicles’
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August 11, 2014  |  Intern Chronicles
Performance Platform Perspectives: A Documentary Project about MPA-Berlin
East Side Gallery/Berlin Wall, Berlin, Germany, May 26, 2014. Photo: Cindy Yeh

East Side Gallery/Berlin Wall, Berlin, Germany, May 26, 2014. Photo: Cindy Yeh

Berlin, the Mecca of performance art, a site of reconciliation and growth, and a community of refugees finding their safe space nestled between street art and reclaimed historical spaces. Continuing my work of performance art documentation, I traveled to Berlin to explore current trends in the medium. During the month of May, many performances take place around the world, but MPA-Berlin really caught my eye because of the intensity of its programming for the month. Read more

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July 30, 2014  |  Intern Chronicles
The Past Is Present: Modern and Contemporary Art in Italy

In Italian, un confronto; in English, a comparison, contrast, or confrontation. In New York, old buildings, like Dia:Beacon, are sometimes beautifully repurposed as museums, but more often they are torn down for something new. In Italy, factories and castles are often transformed into modern and contemporary art institutions. The past confronts the present, and the present is enhanced through its relationship to history. Read more

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June 30, 2014  |  Artists, Intern Chronicles
Art in the Landscape: Exploring Marfa, TX

This May, I had the opportunity to travel to Marfa, Texas, using a generous travel stipend that is one of the fantastic perks of my internship. I’d always wanted to go to Marfa, a small town in West Texas that’s home to site-specific installations by Donald Judd, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Ilya Kabakov, Dan Flavin, and Roni Horn, among others. Read more

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June 26, 2014  |  Intern Chronicles
The Innovation Route: The Journey Is the Destination
First stop, the birth place of innovation as we know it, Victoria and Albert Museum, London; on right: Origins of the V&A. Print showing foreign departments in the Great Exhibition, 1851. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

First stop, the birth place of innovation as we know it, Victoria and Albert Museum, London; on right: Origins of the V&A. Print showing foreign departments in the Great Exhibition, 1851. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

R&D, or research and development, is commonly associated with innovation. Museums, traditionally, are not. Museums are associated with history. Even when displaying contemporary art, they look back into a recent history, not the future. Innovation demands looking into the future, conducting research into the unknown, without a concrete, expected outcome. A leap of faith. Read more

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May 30, 2014  |  Intern Chronicles
Belonging, Equality, and Movement: Tracing Accessible and Inclusive Practices in San Francisco Museums

After a long and cold winter in New York, I found myself waiting outside the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco on a warm and sunny day. As I was waiting for my appointment with the museum’s Education and Access Manager, I was already comparing San Francisco with New York, and my hometown of Istanbul, in terms of accessibility and whether museums in these cities are relevant to people with disabilities. Read more

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May 22, 2014  |  Intern Chronicles
The Big Picture: Media Methods at Newseum

The entrance to Newsueum, Washington, DC. Image courtesy Newseum

The entrance to Newsueum, Washington, DC. Image courtesy Newseum

April in Washington, DC. Cherry blossoms, sunny weather, and an in-depth analysis of one of Washington’s top attractions: the Newseum. Boasting six levels, 15 theaters, and 16 exhibits, the Newseum is one of the largest museums I have ever been to. Functioning as an interactive learning experience and a production facility—Al-Jazeera America broadcasts from the building—the Newseum is structured in a radically different way than MoMA. Read more

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Once Upon a Time: Archives Tales at the Van Abbemuseum

One of the many Contexts vitrines in Once Upon a Time…the Collection Now at the Van Abbemuseum

What kind of stories do a museum’s archives tell when read in tandem with masterpieces in their permanent collections? After allowing me to explore innovative exhibition strategies for archival material last summer, this year, MoMA’s intern travel grant gave me the opportunity to visit a Dutch museum that is contending with that exact question. Read more

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October 7, 2013  |  Intern Chronicles, Library and Archives
Examining Archives Exhibition Strategies in Mexico City
Installation view of Arkheia exhibition Visita al Archivo Olivier Debroise: entre la ficcion y el documento, 2011.  Courtesy of Centro de Documentación Arkheia, MUAC, UNAM / Furniture design by Giacomo Castagnola.

Installation view of the Arkheia exhibition Visita al Archivo Olivier Debroise: entre la ficción y el documento, 2011. Courtesy of Centro de Documentación Arkheia, MUAC, UNAM. Furniture design by Giacomo Castagnola

Working with the fascinating collections in the MoMA Archives on a daily basis has led me to think about the ways in which archives share their unpublished material with the public. Read more

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September 9, 2013  |  Intern Chronicles
More Chaos, Please: Dutch Teen Programs at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and Showroom MAMA
Blikopeners, Photo: Tomek Whitfield

Blikopeners, Photo: Tomek Whitfield

It is possible there is no cooler place to be an artsy young person than in the Netherlands. Were you curating art spaces in famous modern and contemporary art museums when you were 17? Or designing tours and educational programs at galleries? I sure wasn’t. But the teenagers with whom I met while on a professional development trip to the Netherlands are doing just that.

Robin's photo on the wall in the Blikopener Spot

Robin’s photo on the wall in the Blikopener Spot

Robin is a Blikopener at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. As he and I walked around the museum, Robin explained to me that the Blikopeners (“Eye Openers”) are a group of teens at the museum who give tours to the general public and who run the Blikopener Spot, a gallery and educational space on the lower level of the new museum building. Marlous van Gastel, who oversees the program for the education department, looks for a variety of teens: outspoken leaders, quiet creative types, knowledgeable art historians. After attending interactive training sessions, the Blikopeners give tours of the museum in pairs. Robin studies art history and knows a lot about the works of art, so he likes to partner with people who are good at asking fruitful questions and engaging audiences in close looking. These Blikopeners never get bored—they can develop new tours and pick new partners, and they work with the curatorial and conservation departments to choose artworks for the Blikopener Spot.

They also partner with other teen programs across the Netherlands. I traveled to Rotterdam to meet with some of the people with whom they’ve collaborated at Showroom MAMA, a contemporary art center by and for young artists. MAMA has about 30 Rookies, young people ages 16-26 who work on all aspects of the center’s operations. Recruited and trained by Margriet Brouwer, the Rookies design exhibitions, develop educational programs, assist visiting artists, raise funds, and more. Bram, a Rookie and current intern (meaning he’s time-based, not project-based), oversees the MAMA Rocks Around website, a resource for Rookies who give tours of the center’s exhibitions to school groups. The website is in Dutch, but he explained to me that it includes suggestions for interactive activities (e.g. If the person in this artwork had a Facebook page, what would it look like? What would be this character’s online persona?) and other tricks of the trade. The management and development of this website is handed off to a new intern every few months to ensure that many Rookies get a chance to spearhead such a project.

From left to right: Martine, myself, Margriet, Bram, Lara, Yaël

From left to right: Martine, myself, Margriet, Bram, Lara, Yaël

Showroom MAMA also runs a Rookies Junior program, the first iteration of which began as MAMA’s All Girls Street Art Collective, a group which has since evolved into an independent artists’ collective called ONSKRUID. They were commissioned to create a six-meter high wall for the Kunsthal Rotterdam exhibition The Fashion World of Jean-Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, and in July they led a workshop at the Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art in Utrecht. I met with two of these nine young women, Lara and Yaël, who blew me away with their talent, confidence, and general awesomeness.

Artwork by Lara, Photo: Lotte Stekelenburg

Artwork by Lara, Photo: Lotte Stekelenburg

Lara first approached the Collective as a writer unfamiliar with street art but eager for a creative outlet. Under the leadership of Martine Poot, the Collective explored street art around the Netherlands, met with female street artists, and created art collectively and independently. Each member came up with her own signature style. Staying true to her roots as a writer, Lara bases her artwork around words. Her tagline of choice? “More chaos please.” The Collective’s artworks were shown last spring at Showroom MAMA—a remarkable exhibition due to the quality of the artworks and the fact that all the artists were younger than 18.

These teens at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and Showroom MAMA and the supportive staff who run these programs are changing the face of the Dutch contemporary art scene for the better. Art should not sit passively by in stuffy institutions. It should inspire and empower. Art should be in the hands and minds of the interested, the creative, and the young. Lara said it well: more chaos, please.