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MoMA

TAG: INTERACTION DESIGN

Posts tagged ‘interaction design’
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June 11, 2014  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Design
Biophilia, the First App in MoMA’s Collection
Björk Gudmunsdóttir, Scott Snibbe, and Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag of M/M Paris; with Max Weisel of Relative Wave; Kodama Studios; Sarah Stocker; Mark Danks; John F. Simon, Jr.; and Touch Press. Biophilia. 2011. Interactive digital application for tablet devices. Gift of Björk and One Little Indian

Björk Gudmunsdóttir, with Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag of M/M Paris, Sjón, Scott Snibbe, Sarah Stocker and Mark Danks of Kodama Studios, Touch Press, Max Weisel of Relative Wave, Nikki Deben, Stephen Malinowski, and John F. Simon, Jr. Biophilia. 2011. Interactive digital application for tablet devices. Gift of Björk and One Little Indian

I cannot forget the first time I heard and saw Björk. It was 1987, she was part of the Sugarcubes, and she was singing the most arresting song, “Birthday.” The video was shot in Rejkyavik—otherworldly light, curious characters, peculiar architecture. She looked like an alien Tinkerbell and her voice was simultaneously haunting, corrosive, and incredibly moving. In the decades since, Björk has never ceased to experiment and surprise. Read more

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February 14, 2014  |  Collection & Exhibitions
A Few Ideas from the MoMA Design Collection

To the visitor, a museum might appear as a collection of objects. And it certainly is, a collection painstakingly assembled by generations of curators. But intrinsic to MoMA’s curatorial approach is the museum as a collection of ideas, represented by the objects (which convey concepts like abstraction, organicism, and postmodernism) and also communicated though the curator’s selection and grouping of objects. As curators, we are constantly identifying timely concepts worth exploring and representing through MoMA’s collection. Because design is a field often directly engaged with the technology and issues of its time, it demands a contemporary approach and interpretation. Our upcoming exhibition A Collection of Ideas presents several lenses through which MoMA looks at design and the contemporary world—significant areas of research that examine the connection between design and violence; the increasingly important field of interaction design; and the relationship between nature and the built environment, which demands urgent attention and redefinition.

Joris Laarman. Bone Chair, 2006. Aluminum. Manufactured by Joris Laarman Studio (The Netherlands, est. 2006). Gift of the Fund for the Twenty-First Century, 2008. The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Joris Laarman. Bone Chair, 2006. Aluminum. Manufactured by Joris Laarman Studio (The Netherlands, est. 2006). Gift of the Fund for the Twenty-First Century, 2008. The Museum of Modern Art, New York

“Organic Design,” the first idea explored in this installation, presents the most recent manifestations of a centuries-old quest—learning from nature how to build elegantly, economically, and sustainably. Organic design, influenced by natural forms and processes, has advanced very rapidly in the 21st century. Computer-aided design and 3-D printing technologies have enabled designers to emulate nature’s economies and building methods. Joris Laarman’s 2006 Bone Chair, for example, was designed using three-dimensional optimization software that mimics the generative process of bones to concentrate the object’s mass and strength in the areas that bear the most stress.

Gerhard Heufler and Hans Georg Shiebel. Camcopter S-100 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, 2004. Carbon fiber and titanium. Manufactured by Schiebel Elektronische Geräte GmbH (Austria, est. 1951).  Gift of the manufacturer, 2006. The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Gerhard Heufler and Hans Georg Shiebel. Camcopter S-100 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. 2004. Carbon fiber and titanium. Manufactured by Schiebel Elektronische Geräte GmbH (Austria, est. 1951).
Gift of the manufacturer, 2006. The Museum of Modern Art, New York

“Design and Violence” (also an online curatorial experiment at designandviolence.MoMA.org) seeks to comprehend the complex impact of design on the built environment and on everyday life, as well as the manifestations of violence in contemporary society. Designers aim to change the world around them—often in fundamental ways—and the consequences can be drastic when they overstep, indulge temptations, adopt abhorrent goals, or even simply err. The Museum’s Camcopter S-100 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, designed by Gerhard Heufler and Hans Georg Schiebel in 2004, is a drone originally intended for aerial landmine detection and eradication. Drones are design objects that have seen an upsurge in news coverage for applications that range from the hostile (as weapons of warfare) to the benign (as delivery vehicles for consumer products).

Allan Alcorn of Atari, Inc. (USA, est. 1972). Pong. 1972. Published by Atari, Inc. (USA, est. 1972). Gift of Atari Interactive, Inc., 2013. Image © 2014 Atari, Inc.

Allan Alcorn of Atari, Inc. (USA, est. 1972). Pong. 1972. Published by Atari, Inc. Gift of Atari Interactive, Inc., 2013. Image © 2014 Atari, Inc.

Markus “Notch” Persson of Mojang (Sweden, est. 2009). Minecraft. 2011. Published by Mojang (Sweden, est. 2009). Gift of Mojang, 2013. Image © 2014 Mojang

Markus “Notch” Persson of Mojang (Sweden, est. 2009). Minecraft. 2011. Published by Mojang. Gift of Mojang, 2013. Image © 2014 Mojang

“Interaction Design” is another idea represented in the display of eight newly acquired videogames (from 1972′s Pong to 2011′s Minecraft), and by digital icons such as the ubiquitous Google Map Pin. The exhibition’s curator, Paola Antonelli points out that,”Interaction designers build the digital dimension of our lives, choreographing everything from the way we tap the screens of our mobile devices to our exchanges with ATM machines.” Our ever more digital world calls for interaction design that is aesthetically appealing, functionally and structurally ingenious, and innovative in how it approaches technology and anticipates user behavior.

These clusters of objects showcase not only new acquisitions and highlights from MoMA’s collection, but also timely categories of investigation and their representative design forms—new ideas and new approaches for the contemporary age.

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June 28, 2013  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Design
Video Games: Seven More Building Blocks in MoMA’s Collection
Ralph Baer. Magnavox Odyssey. 1972. Manufactured by Magnavox

Ralph Baer. Magnavox Odyssey. 1972. Various materials. Purchase

Quite a lot has happened since we announced the first 14 video games to enter the MoMA collection, seven months ago. Read more

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November 29, 2012  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Design
Video Games: 14 in the Collection, for Starters

Now on View!

We are very proud to announce that MoMA has acquired a selection of 14 video games, the seedbed for an initial wish list of about 40 to be acquired in the near future, as well as for a new category of artworks in MoMA’s collection that we hope will grow in the future. This initial group, now installed for your delight in the Applied Design exhibition the Museum’s Philip Johnson Galleries, features: Read more