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MoMA

TAG: DEPARTMENT OF PAINTING AND SCULPTURE

Posts tagged ‘Department of Painting and Sculpture’
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October 8, 2014  |  Artists
Collateral Damage: Lari Pittman’s Flying Carpet with Magic Mirrors for a Distorted Nation
Lari Pittman. Flying Carpet with Magic Mirrors for a Distorted Nation. 2013. Cel-vinyl, spray enamel on canvas over wood panel, 108 x 360 1/8” (274.3 x 914.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. CREDIT LINE TK. Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles. © Lari Pittman

Lari Pittman. Flying Carpet with Magic Mirrors for a Distorted Nation. 2013. Cel-vinyl, spray enamel on canvas over wood panel, 108 x 360 1/8” (274.3 x 914.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Foundation, The Broad Art Foundation, and Jill and Peter Kraus. Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles. © Lari Pittman

How does an artist approach the grand tradition of history painting in the era of late capitalism, a time marked not by great heroes and legendary victories but by systemic inequity and unrelenting violence? With Flying Carpet with Magic Mirrors for a Distorted Nation, part of a group of three “flying carpet” paintings that was the centerpiece of his 2013 exhibition From a Late Western Impaerium, Lari Pittman considers the heavy psychological toll of life under a declining empire. Read more

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May 8, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Speaking with Joan Snyder about Sweet Cathy’s Song (1978)

Installation view, caption TK

Installation view of the fourth-floor Alfred H. Barr Painting and Sculpture Galleries, The Museum of Modern Art, spring 2014. Pictured are works by (from left to right) Sam Gilliam, Dennis Oppenheim (in case), Elizabeth Murray, Joan Snyder, and (on floor) Lynda Benglis

A new installation in the galleries brings together a diverse group of works from the late 1960s and 1970s, a moment when many artists radically reexamined the medium of painting. Read more

April 14, 2010  |  Behind the Scenes
MoMA Offsite: Where Did It Go?

Vincent van Gogh. The Starry Night. 1889

In this column I have often discussed the efforts made by the Department of Painting and Sculpture to circulate works in our collection galleries as frequently as we can manage, thereby showing the broadest possible range of our extensive holdings. All of our works are historically significant in their own way; still, we do recognize that there are dedicated audiences for certain landmark acquisitions made by the Museum, and so there are a few works that remain on view indefinitely. Les Demoiselles D’Avignon (1907) by Pablo Picasso, The Starry Night (1889) by Vincent van Gogh, and Salvador Dalí’s The Persistence of Memory (1931) certainly all fall into this category.

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Small Steps Lead to Bigger Changes: MoMA’s Shifting Wall Colors

On one of my recent early-morning checks of the fifth-floor collection galleries—a daily duty of the curatorial staff, to spot any oddities—an elusive, visceral feeling gave me pause. It took me a moment to recognize that it was prompted by the wall color, which, as I moved from the European Expressionist gallery to the adjacent Matisse room, had changed from a light grey to what appeared to be a bright white. This color change is subtle enough to likely go unnoticed by many visitors, but deserves a brief moment of attention.

View of Cézanne to Picasso: Paintings from the David and Peggy Rockefeller Collection, July 17, 2009–August 31, 2009. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: John Wronn

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