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TAG: CHRISTIAN MARCLAY

Posts tagged ‘christian marclay’
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December 24, 2012  |  Collection & Exhibitions
Happy Holidays and Happy New Year! Back on January 2
Christian Marclay. Video stills from The Clock. 2010. Single-channel video with sound, 24 hours. Courtesy the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Christian Marclay. Video stills from The Clock. 2010. Single-channel video with sound, 24 hours. Courtesy the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Happy Holidays and Happy New Year!  Hope you enjoy the holiday season to the fullest, and we’ll be back on January 2.

If you are in New York City for New Year’s Eve, come to MoMA for a special showing of Christian Marclay’s cinematic tour de force The Clock in its entirety, which is the first opportunity for the public to view all 24 hours of the piece at MoMA. The Clock will go on view at 10:30 a.m. on Monday, December 31, and will run continuously until 5:30 p.m. on January 1. In conjunction with this showing, the Museum’s Cafe 2 restaurant offers a special menu of wines, cheeses, salumi, and desserts on New Year’s Eve from 10:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m., along with an all-night espresso bar. We hope you will join us!

 

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June 7, 2012  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Christian Marclay: Sound on Paper

Sound forms the nucleus of much of American artist Christian Marclay’s practice. From innovative sound collages, with turntables and records employed as instruments; to the splicing and reconstituting of physical records to create strange, jumping concoctions of melodies Read more

April 6, 2011  |  Collection & Exhibitions
At the Crossroads of Art and Sound in the 1980s

TELLUSTools. 2001. Double-LP. Inside cover Art by Christian Marclay

TELLUSTools. 2001. Double-LP. Composition: 12 1/4 x 24 5/8\

Long before the days of turntables and synthesizers, the composer John Cage revolutionized the way art saw music and music saw art with pieces like the infamous “4:33,” in which he took the stage, sat at the piano, prepared to play, and then sat in silence for four minutes and 33 seconds before exiting the stage. The legacy of Cage’s work is alive in many of the pieces on view in Looking at Music 3.0, particularly in the work of Brian Eno, David Byrne, Christian Marclay, and John Zorn. Like Cage, these artists were invested in experimental composition and built their careers at the nexus between fine art, music, and performance. Read more