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TAG: ANIMATION

Posts tagged ‘animation’
John-hubley-tender-game-e1356129888322-150x150
December 25, 2012  |  An Auteurist History of Film
An Auteurist History of Film: Independent Animation, 1947–60
The Tender Game. 1958. Directed by John Hubley animated film

The Tender Game. 1958. USA. Directed by John Hubley

These notes accompany a program of independent animated films screening on December 26, 27, and 28 in Theater 3.

The departure of many animation artists from Disney as a result of labor troubles and a desire for freer expression led to a diffusion of talent and styles in the animation field. Read more

The-fabulous-world-of-jules-verne-e1354572136156-150x150
December 4, 2012  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Karel Zeman’s The Fabulous World of Jules Verne

These notes accompany screenings of Karel Zeman’s The Fabulous World of Jules Verne on December 5, 6, and 7 in Theater 3.

The Fabulous World of Jules Verne film 1958 Czechoslovakia Karel Zeman

The Fabulous World of Jules Verne. 1958. Czechoslovakia. Written and directed by Karel Zeman

Our series is dedicated this month to an all-too-brief look at developments in the field of animation in the 1940s and 1950s. Read more

Pinocchio-150x150
April 19, 2011  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Walt Disney’s Pinocchio

Pinocchio. 1940. USA. Produced by Walt Disney

Pinocchio. 1940. USA. Produced by Walt Disney

These notes accompany the screenings of Walt Disney’s Pinocchio on April 20, 21, and 22 in Theater 3.

As this is being written, the number one film at the box office for the second straight week is an animated work, Hop, about the picaresque adventures of the long-eared heir to a chocolate bunny factory. Hopping out to see Hop is not high on my agenda (hopping of any kind has not been on my agenda at all since the five-minute “Bunny Hop” craze over a half-century ago), but there has been a proud relationship between bunnies and the cinema for a long time, from John Bunny (the silent clown) to Bunny Lake (Otto Preminger’s abducted little girl). And of course, we can never lavish enough praise on that 14-carrot genius, Bugs. Read more

February 10, 2011  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Film
Leonardo: Da Vinci at MoMA

Still image from Leonardo. Directed by Jim Capobianco. 2010

People often ask me, “How do you discover new films for acquisition for the MoMA collection?” This is a good question that mines the basics of curatorial work, but one that is also impossible to answer in a concise manner. Our collection is growing all the time, and each work has its own unique origin story. Here’s one of them. Read more

February 8, 2011  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Disney, Iwerks, and Fleischer in the 1930s

These notes accompany the Disney, Iwerks, and Fleischer in the 1930s program on February 9, 10, and 11 in Theater 3.

Last June we presented a brief survey of early animation in both America and Europe. On the continent, with the emergence of figures like Walter Ruttmann and Oskar Fischinger in Germany and (with the coming of sound) Len Lye in Britain, abstraction became the predominant form. Lotte Reiniger continued her silhouettes, eventually landing also in Britain. Ladislas Starevitch spent the first decade of the sound era working on the puppet feature Le Roman de Renard in France. Read more

June 1, 2010  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Early Animation
Gertie the Dinosaur. 1914. USA. Directed by Winsor McCay. Preserved with funding from Celeste Bartos

Gertie the Dinosaur. 1914. USA. Directed by Winsor McCay. Preserved with funding from Celeste Bartos

These notes accompany the Early Animation program, June 2, 3, and 4 in Theater 2.

The art of film animation developed out of a long tradition of newspaper and magazine cartoonists both in Europe and the United States. The Frenchman, Emile Cohl (1857–1938), and the American, Winsor McCay (1871–1934), were politically tinged newspapermen who took advantage of the newly-invented concept of stop-motion photography, shooting a slightly varied drawing on each successive film frame. Although their work appears primitive beside Pixar technology, there must have been a sense of wonder and awe in early audiences who saw drawn figures come to a kind of life on the screen. Read more

The Making of Tim Burton’s MoMA Animation

To help promote MoMA’s Tim Burton retrospective, we asked Burton himself to animate the MoMA logo for a thirty-second video that would be used to promote the exhibition on television, at the Museum, and online. Tim quickly came up with a concept utilizing stop-motion animation, and he asked Allison Abbate, his producer on Corpse Bride (2005) and the upcoming full-length version of Frankenweenie, if she could help pull things together. Read more