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CATEGORY: COLLECTION & EXHIBITIONS

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July 11, 2014  |  Do You Know Your MoMA?
Do You Know Your MoMA? 7/11/14

DYKYM_7-11-14

How well do you know your MoMA? If you think you can identify the artist and title of each of these works from MoMA’s collection—all currently on view throughout the Museum—please submit your answers by leaving a comment on this post. We’ll provide the answers next month (on Friday, August 8). Read more

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Polke Pop-Up Activity Space
MoMA visitors participate in a Polke Pop-Up Activity

MoMA visitors participate in a Polke Pop-Up Activity

If you happen to visit the exhibition Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010 on Tuesday afternoons you will notice something different: the sight of Museum visitors making art inspired by Sigmar Polke’s processes, in close proximity to his works of art. This shift toward more hands-on learning experiences is not something that happened overnight. Read more

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June 25, 2014  |  Collection & Exhibitions
The Cien House: Building Conceptions in Space
Pezo von Ellrichshausen, Mauricio Pezo, Sófia von Ellrichshausen. Cien House, Concepción, Chile. 2009–11. Concrete model, 14 × 14 × 5" (35.6 × 35.6 × 12.7 cm). Photo: Pamela Popeson

Pezo von Ellrichshausen, Mauricio Pezo, Sófia von Ellrichshausen. Cien House, Concepción, Chile. 2009–11. Concrete model, 14 × 14 × 5″ (35.6 × 35.6 × 12.7 cm). Photo: Pamela Popeson

I’m a big fan of buildings, which is to say walking around looking at buildings, taking city architecture tours by bike, or car trips out to a particular site, checking out exteriors, interiors—all of it. But for me, architects’ models and drawings are really where it’s at.

There’s an intimacy to architectural drawings and models that fosters a feeling of a sort of partnership, offering an insider’s invitation to that place where it’s clear that the ideas behind making buildings are about so much more than the plans for access elevators or where to put the closets. Read more

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June 23, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
The Subway and the City: Massimo Vignelli, 1931–2014
Massimo and Lella Vignelli.  Photograph by Barry McKinley. Courtesy AIGA

Massimo and Lella Vignelli. Photo: Barry McKinley. Courtesy AIGA

When Massimo Vignelli, one of the greatest graphic designers of the 20th century, was close to death in mid-May, his son Luca informed the whole design community—at Vignelli’s request—so we could say goodbye with our thoughts and with a letter. Read more

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June 20, 2014  |  Collection & Exhibitions
Talking John Cage with David Platzker and Jon Hendricks

John Cage. 4'33" (In Proportional Notation). 1952/53. Ink on paper, each page: 11 x 8 1/2" (27.9 x 21.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Henry Kravis in honor of Marie-Josée Kravis, 2012. © 2014 John Cage Trust

John Cage. 4’33″ (In Proportional Notation). 1952/53. Ink on paper, each page: 11 x 8 1/2″ (27.9 x 21.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of Henry Kravis in honor of Marie-Josée Kravis, 2012. © 2014 John Cage Trust

I had the pleasure of speaking with David Platzker and Jon Hendricks, curators of There Will Never Be Silence: Scoring John Cage’s 4’33″ (October 12, 2013 to June 22, 2014), about the development of the show. David Platzker has been Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, since May 2013. Jon Hendricks is an artist and Fluxus Consulting Curator of the Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection. Read more

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June 18, 2014  |  Collection & Exhibitions
Hito Steyerl’s HOW NOT TO BE SEEN: A F**king Didactic Educational .MOV File
Hito Steyerl. HOW NOT TO BE SEEN: A Fucking Didactic Educational .Mov File. 2013. Still image, single screen 1080p .mov file, 14min. © Hito Steyerl. Courtesy Wilfried Lentz Rotterdam

Hito Steyerl. HOW NOT TO BE SEEN: A Fucking Didactic Educational .Mov File. 2013. Still image, single screen 1080p .mov file, 14min. © Hito Steyerl. Courtesy Wilfried Lentz Rotterdam

I go to bed with my phone. It’s often the last thing I look at before falling asleep, and the first thing I touch in the morning. There’s no shortage of people thinking about this type of thing—technology-as-prosthesis or part-object—and its array of consequences, but few get to the heart of the matter quite like Hito Steyerl does. Read more

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June 16, 2014  |  Do You Know Your MoMA?
Do You Know Your MoMA? 6/16/14

DYKYM_6-13-14

How well do you know your MoMA? If you think you can identify the artist and title of each of these works from MoMA’s collection—all currently on view throughout the Museum—please submit your answers by leaving a comment on this post. We’ll provide the answers next month (on Friday, July 11). Read more

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June 12, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Tapping the Subconscious: The Hypnotic Art of Matt Mullican
Matt Mullican. Untitled (Learning from That Person's Work: Room 1). 2005. Installation of ink on paper collage mounted on 12 cotton sheets, wood, cable, and video component (color, sound; 14:04 min.), 12 units, each 109 x 88.5", installation dimensions variable. Acquired through the generosity of the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art and the Friends of Contemporary Drawing. © 2014 Matt Mullican

Matt Mullican. Untitled (Learning from That Person’s Work: Room 1). 2005. Installation of ink on paper collage mounted on 12 cotton sheets, wood, cable, and video component (color, sound; 14:04 min.), 12 units, each 109 x 88.5″, installation dimensions variable. Acquired through the generosity of the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art and the Friends of Contemporary Drawing. © 2014 Matt Mullican

Matt Mullican. Untitled (Learning from That Person’s Work) (detail). 2005. Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia. © 2014 Matt Mullican

Matt Mullican. Untitled (Learning from That Person’s Work) (detail). 2005. Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia. © 2014 Matt Mullican

When I think of art created from an altered state of mind or from the subconscious, I immediately go to the automatic drawing practices of the Surrealists, or of art brut and “outsider art.” Art brut, literally “raw art,” is a term coined by artist Jean Dubuffet in the mid-1940s to describe work made outside of the established art world. Over the years it has been used to categorize art created by the mentally ill, the incarcerated, and the formally untrained. Read more

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June 11, 2014  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Design
Biophilia, the First App in MoMA’s Collection
Björk Gudmunsdóttir, Scott Snibbe, and Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag of M/M Paris; with Max Weisel of Relative Wave; Kodama Studios; Sarah Stocker; Mark Danks; John F. Simon, Jr.; and Touch Press. Biophilia. 2011. Interactive digital application for tablet devices. Gift of Björk and One Little Indian

Björk Gudmunsdóttir, with Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag of M/M Paris, Sjón, Scott Snibbe, Sarah Stocker and Mark Danks of Kodama Studios, Touch Press, Max Weisel of Relative Wave, Nikki Deben, Stephen Malinowski, and John F. Simon, Jr. Biophilia. 2011. Interactive digital application for tablet devices. Gift of Björk and One Little Indian

I cannot forget the first time I heard and saw Björk. It was 1987, she was part of the Sugarcubes, and she was singing the most arresting song, “Birthday.” The video was shot in Rejkyavik—otherworldly light, curious characters, peculiar architecture. She looked like an alien Tinkerbell and her voice was simultaneously haunting, corrosive, and incredibly moving. In the decades since, Björk has never ceased to experiment and surprise. Read more

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June 5, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Sigmar Polke’s Printed Dots
Installation view of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, April 19–August 3, 2014. © 2014 The Estate of Sigmar Polke/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany

Installation view of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, April 19–August 3, 2014. © 2014 The Estate of Sigmar Polke/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany

Within the arsenal of unusual and experimental techniques on clamorous display in Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010, the artist’s prints are notable for their sly celebration of the halftone dot pattern, the tonal register that has enabled images to be reproduced in newspaper photographs, magazine ads, consumer packaging, etc. since the late 19th century. Read more