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CATEGORY: COLLECTION & EXHIBITIONS

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April 24, 2015  |  Five for Friday
Five for Friday: Yes We Can! (or Nice Cans, or It’s in the Can)

Five for Friday, written by a variety of MoMA staff members, is our attempt to spotlight some of the compelling, charming, and downright curious works in the Museum’s rich collection.

The exhibition Andy Warhol: Campbell’s Soup Cans and Other Works, 1953–1967 opens tomorrow (April 25), and as the title implies, the show’s focal point is Warhol’s iconic 1962 suite of 32 paintings of, well, Campbell’s Soup cans. Read more

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April 22, 2015  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
A Homecoming for Romare Bearden’s The Visitation
Romare Bearden (American, 1911−1988). The Visitation. 1941. Gouache, ink, and pencil on brown paper, 30 1/2 x 46 1/2" (77.5 x 118.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (by exchange). Acquired with the cooperation of the Estate of Nanette Bearden and the Romare Bearden Foundation whose mission is to preserve the legacy of the artist. © Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Romare Bearden (American, 1911−1988). The Visitation. 1941. Gouache, ink, and pencil on brown paper, 30 1/2 x 46 1/2″ (77.5 x 118.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (by exchange). Acquired with the cooperation of the Estate of Nanette Bearden and the Romare Bearden Foundation whose mission is to preserve the legacy of the artist. © Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Before Romare Bearden turned to the medium of collage in 1964—the multilayered compositions, for which he is best known—he was steeped in the language of drawing and painting. The Visitation (1941) (now on view in the exhibition One-Way Ticket: Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series and Other Visions of the Great Movement North) exemplifies a critical early moment in the development of an artist who would become a leading voice in the cultural life of Harlem and in the history of American art. Recently acquired by MoMA, The Visitation returns to the Museum’s galleries for the first time since the 1971 retrospective Romare Bearden: The Prevalence of Ritual. Read more

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April 10, 2015  |  Do You Know Your MoMA?
Do You Know Your MoMA? 4/10/15

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How well do you know your MoMA? If you think you can identify the artist and title of each of these works from MoMA’s collection—all currently on view throughout the Museum—please submit your answers by leaving a comment on this post. We’ll provide the answers next month (on Friday, May 8). Read more

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April 2, 2015  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Mark Bradford’s Urban Etchings
Mark Bradford (American, b. 1961). Untitled. 2012. Series of 14 etching and photogravures with chine-collé. Each sheet: 20 x 16" (50.8 x 40.6 cm). Publisher: Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York. Printer: Lower East Side Printshop, New York. Edition: 25. Installation view, Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection, 2015–16, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Prints and Illustrated Books Fund, 2014. © 2015 Mark Bradford. Photo: David Moreno

Mark Bradford (American, b. 1961). Untitled. 2012. Series of 14 etching and photogravures with chine-collé. Each sheet: 20 x 16″ (50.8 x 40.6 cm). Publisher: Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York. Printer: Lower East Side Printshop, New York. Edition: 25. Installation view, Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection, 2015–16, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Prints and Illustrated Books Fund, 2014. © 2015 Mark Bradford. Photo: David Moreno

Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection, a sweeping reinstallation of MoMA’s Contemporary Galleries, is a markedly cross-medium selection of works from the Museum’s collection. Created in the past three decades by more than 30 international artists, the works in the exhibition span a range of approaches that respond to the political, social, and cultural flux of our time.

Situated prominently in one of the final galleries, and on view at MoMA for the first time, Mark Bradford’s set of untitled 2012 etchings leave an unexpected mark—both literally and figuratively. Read more

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April 1, 2015  |  Collection & Exhibitions
. at MoMA
Artist unknown. .. n.d. The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Artist unknown. . (period). n.d. Here displayed in Times New Roman. The Museum of Modern Art, New York

MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design has acquired the . (aka “period,” “hard stop,” or “baseline dot”) into its collection.

As MoMA has proven with its recent acquisition of the “@” symbol, it is more important to recognize major design innovations than it is to actually, you know, possess them, and few things are more deserving of recognition that our concise little friend the .. Read more

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March 27, 2015  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Design
This Is for Everyone: Free Play
Golan Levin. Free Art and Technology Lab, R. Shawn Sims, Sy-Lab. Free Universal Construction Kit. 2012. Digital CAD files and 80 3-D-printed nylon units. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the Committee on Architecture & Design and Shapeways

Golan Levin. Free Art and Technology Lab, R. Shawn Sims, Sy-Lab. Free Universal Construction Kit. 2012. Digital CAD files and 80 3-D-printed nylon units. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the Committee on Architecture & Design and Shapeways

When the world we live in feels too impossible I find myself imagining the world I want to live in. It’s not just about the major acts of horrific inhumanity that humans bestow upon one another, it’s about the small daily indignities too. In the world I want to live in we’re not senselessly slaughtering each other, and no one throws trash on the ground or holds the entire communal table in the coffee shop hostage with their cell phone conversation, either. And people actually do step aside to let the passengers off the train. In the world I want to live in, it’s understood that we are all in this together. Call me a cockeyed optimist, but I’m convinced that the smallest effort toward compatibility goes a long way. Read more

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March 26, 2015  |  Collection & Exhibitions, MoMA Stores
Future Couture: Nervous System’s Kinematics Dress
Nervous System (est. 2007), Jessica Rosenkrantz (American, b. 1983), Jesse Louis-Rosenberg (American, b. 1986). Kinematics Dress. 2013. Laser-sintered nylon. Image courtesy of Steve Marsel. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Architecture and Design Funds

Nervous System (est. 2007), Jessica Rosenkrantz (American, b. 1983), Jesse Louis-Rosenberg (American, b. 1986). Kinematics Dress. 2013. Laser-sintered nylon. Image courtesy of Steve Marsel. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Architecture and Design Funds

One of the most fascinating pieces in the current design exhibition This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good is a pretty dress with a classically feminine silhouette that wouldn’t look out of place at a fashionable cocktail party. But take a closer look at its supple but strangely undulating texture, and you’ll find that this frock is like no garment you have ever seen—because it was created with a printer. Read more

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March 25, 2015  |  Collection & Exhibitions
Layers of Paint, and What Is (or Isn’t) Painted: A Gallery Tour with The Forever Now Artist Dianna Molzan
Dianna Molzan in the galleries. Shown, from left: Paul Cézanne (French, 1839–1906). Still Life with Apples. 1895–98. Oil on canvas, 27 x 36 1/2" (68.6 x 92.7 cm). Lillie P. Bliss Collection; Georges-Pierre Seurat (French, 1859–1891). Evening, Honfleur. 1886. Oil on canvas, with painted wood frame, 30 3/4 x 37" (78.3 x 94 cm) including frame. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy

Dianna Molzan in the galleries. Shown, from left: Paul Cézanne (French, 1839–1906). Still Life with Apples. 1895–98. Oil on canvas, 27 x 36 1/2″ (68.6 x 92.7 cm). Lillie P. Bliss Collection; Georges-Pierre Seurat (French, 1859–1891). Evening, Honfleur. 1886. Oil on canvas, with painted wood frame, 30 3/4 x 37″ (78.3 x 94 cm) including frame. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy

Over the past few months, we’ve asked artists represented in the exhibition The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World to share their thoughts on certain works in MoMA’s collection. I have been lucky enough to tour the Museum’s galleries with three different artists to find out which pieces they found most thought-provoking, and why. (Be sure to read about the previous gallery tours.) Read more

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March 20, 2015  |  Do You Know Your MoMA?
Do You Know Your MoMA? 3/13/15

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How well do you know your MoMA? If you think you can identify the artist and title of each of these works from MoMA’s collection—all currently on view throughout the Museum—please submit your answers by leaving a comment on this post. We’ll provide the answers next month (on Friday, April 10). Read more

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March 18, 2015  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Jean Dubuffet: Textures, Patterns, and Beards
Jean Dubuffet. Textural Transcription I (Transcription texturologique I). 1958. Ink on paper, mounted on board, 9 x 14 1/4" (22.9 x 36.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Joan and Lester Avnet Collection, 1978. Photograph by John Wronn

Jean Dubuffet. Textural Transcription I (Transcription texturologique I). 1958. Ink on paper, mounted on board, 9 x 14 1/4″ (22.9 x 36.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Joan and Lester Avnet Collection, 1978. Photograph by John Wronn. © 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Jean Dubuffet (French, 1901–1985) dedicated years to exploring and recording the natural textures he encountered in his daily life, from the mountainous, rocky landscapes of Vence and the sandy hills of El Goléa to dewy, foggy Parisian mornings or the stars far beyond our skies. Yet his most subtle and intricate depictions of surfaces may be a group of black-and-white ink-on-paper drawings created between 1958 and 1960. Read more