A-|A+

MoMA

CATEGORY: ARTISTS

Posts in ‘Artists’
Feed
Lautrec_image-7-150x150
August 14, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
A Window into MoMA’s Collection of Parisian Avant-Garde Theater Programs

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) was a modern chronicler of Belle Époque Paris. Entrenched in Montmartre life, Lautrec eagerly recorded the late 19th-century dance halls, cabarets, and restaurants integral to his social life with honesty, humor, and liveliness. One of his favorite forms of entertainment was the theater; Read more

Img_5073w-150x150
Looking Back at MoMA Studio: Breathe with Me…and Beyond

This past May and June, MoMA’s Education and Research Building mezzanine was the site of MoMA Studio: Breathe with Me, an interactive space that explored the intersections between art, therapeutic practice, and the ways in which we relate to objects and people through physical encounters. Read more

Picassocubism_cover-150x150
The Art of Picasso as You’ve Never Seen It Before
Cover image of the e-book Picasso: The Making of Cubism 1912–1914, published by MoMA. All works by Pablo Picasso. ©  2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Cover image of the e-book Picasso: The Making of Cubism 1912–1914, published by MoMA.

MoMA recently launched its first digital-only publication, Picasso: The Making of Cubism 1912–1914, edited by Anne Umland and Blair Hartzell, with Scott Gerson. This immersive, interactive study features over 400 high-resolution images and the latest research on 15 groundbreaking Cubist works created by Picasso between 1912 and 1914, and is available as an iPad app through the App Store, or an interactive PDF through MoMAstore.org. Read more

Max-ernst_drawings-150x150
July 31, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
MoMA’s Tiniest Drawing: A Max Ernst Microbe
Max Ernst (French, born Germany. 1891–1976). Adam and Eve Expelled from the Garden of Eden. 1946–47. Gouache on cardstock, 1/2" x 1 3/8" (1.4 x 3.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Pierre Matisse in memory of Patricia Kane Matisse. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Max Ernst (French, born Germany. 1891–1976). Adam and Eve Expelled from the Garden of Eden. 1946–47. Gouache on cardstock, 1/2″ x 1 3/8″ (1.4 x 3.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Pierre Matisse in memory of Patricia Kane Matisse. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

One of the great privileges of being a curator at MoMA is firsthand access to the works that make up our outstanding collection. Yet, even in the case of the Drawings collection, with its share of easily handled, two-dimensional works, this access often begins with an exploration of our digital database. The basic information on a work—artist, title, date, etc.—is readily available here, and makes it an invaluable resource for early research on any project. Read more

1-bird-in-space-e1405609407706-150x150
July 24, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
“But Is It Art?” Constantin Brancusi vs. the United States

Constantin Brancusi. Bird in Space. 1928. Bronze, 54 x 8 1/2 x 6 1/2" (137.2 x 21.6 x 16.5 cm). Given anonymously

Constantin Brancusi. Bird in Space. 1928. Bronze, 54 x 8 1/2 x 6 1/2″ (137.2 x 21.6 x 16.5 cm). Given anonymously

Have you ever puzzled over a work of art that bears little or no resemblance to its title? In 1926, the disparate relationship between an artwork and its textural description led to one of the most significant clashes of art and law in history: the case of Brancusi v. United States.

Constantin Brancusi (1876–1957) was born in Romania, but from 1904 he lived and worked as a sculptor in Paris. Read more

Ice-plant-150x150
June 30, 2014  |  Artists, Intern Chronicles
Art in the Landscape: Exploring Marfa, TX

This May, I had the opportunity to travel to Marfa, Texas, using a generous travel stipend that is one of the fantastic perks of my internship. I’d always wanted to go to Marfa, a small town in West Texas that’s home to site-specific installations by Donald Judd, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Ilya Kabakov, Dan Flavin, and Roni Horn, among others. Read more

371_2004_1-2_cccr-150x150
June 23, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
The Subway and the City: Massimo Vignelli, 1931–2014
Massimo and Lella Vignelli.  Photograph by Barry McKinley. Courtesy AIGA

Massimo and Lella Vignelli. Photo: Barry McKinley. Courtesy AIGA

When Massimo Vignelli, one of the greatest graphic designers of the 20th century, was close to death in mid-May, his son Luca informed the whole design community—at Vignelli’s request—so we could say goodbye with our thoughts and with a letter. Read more

Matt-mullican-2-150x150
June 12, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Tapping the Subconscious: The Hypnotic Art of Matt Mullican
Matt Mullican. Untitled (Learning from That Person's Work: Room 1). 2005. Installation of ink on paper collage mounted on 12 cotton sheets, wood, cable, and video component (color, sound; 14:04 min.), 12 units, each 109 x 88.5", installation dimensions variable. Acquired through the generosity of the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art and the Friends of Contemporary Drawing. © 2014 Matt Mullican

Matt Mullican. Untitled (Learning from That Person’s Work: Room 1). 2005. Installation of ink on paper collage mounted on 12 cotton sheets, wood, cable, and video component (color, sound; 14:04 min.), 12 units, each 109 x 88.5″, installation dimensions variable. Acquired through the generosity of the Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art and the Friends of Contemporary Drawing. © 2014 Matt Mullican

Matt Mullican. Untitled (Learning from That Person’s Work) (detail). 2005. Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia. © 2014 Matt Mullican

Matt Mullican. Untitled (Learning from That Person’s Work) (detail). 2005. Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia. © 2014 Matt Mullican

When I think of art created from an altered state of mind or from the subconscious, I immediately go to the automatic drawing practices of the Surrealists, or of art brut and “outsider art.” Art brut, literally “raw art,” is a term coined by artist Jean Dubuffet in the mid-1940s to describe work made outside of the established art world. Over the years it has been used to categorize art created by the mentally ill, the incarcerated, and the formally untrained. Read more

2_polke_weekend-house-150x150
June 5, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Sigmar Polke’s Printed Dots
Installation view of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, April 19–August 3, 2014. © 2014 The Estate of Sigmar Polke/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany

Installation view of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, April 19–August 3, 2014. © 2014 The Estate of Sigmar Polke/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany

Within the arsenal of unusual and experimental techniques on clamorous display in Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010, the artist’s prints are notable for their sly celebration of the halftone dot pattern, the tonal register that has enabled images to be reproduced in newspaper photographs, magazine ads, consumer packaging, etc. since the late 19th century. Read more

Graves_unnamed-bird-of-the-inner-eye-150x150
May 23, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
John Cage and the Northwest School
Mark Tobey. The Void Devouring the Gadget Era. 1942. Tempera on board, 21 7/8 x 30" (55.3 x 76.0 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist, 1964. © 2014 Estate of Mark Tobey/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Mark Tobey. The Void Devouring the Gadget Era. 1942. Tempera on board, 21 7/8 x 30″ (55.3 x 76.0 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist, 1964. © 2014 Estate of Mark Tobey/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The first gallery of the exhibition There Will Never Be Silence: Scoring John Cage’s 4’33″ contains works by John Cage’s contemporaries and influences, including such well-known names as Marcel Duchamp, Joseph Albers, Jasper Johns, Barnett Newman, and Robert Rauschenberg. Works by two lesser-known West Coast artists, Mark Tobey and Morris Graves, also occupy this space, pointing to Cage’s brief but seminal years living in Seattle. Read more