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March 16, 2016  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Forgotten Bodies and Their Images: Maria Hassabi’s PLASTIC
Maria Hassabi. PLASTIC. 2015. Installation view, The Museum of Modern Art, February 21–March 20, 2016. Pictured: Maria Hassabi, Oisín Monaghan, Molly Lieber, Hristoula Harakas. Photo: Thomas Poravas. © Maria Hassabi

Maria Hassabi. PLASTIC. 2015. Installation view, The Museum of Modern Art, February 21–March 20, 2016. Pictured: Maria Hassabi, Oisín Monaghan, Molly Lieber, Hristoula Harakas. Photo: Thomas Poravas. © Maria Hassabi

There are forgotten bodies throughout The Museum of Modern Art. At least, that is how artist and choreographer Maria Hassabi refers to them. On staircases, in the Marron Atrium, and on furniture, visible from balconies and vantage points throughout the building, dancers fall, walk, crawl, or lounge on the floor, alongside accumulated dust and discarded ticket stubs. Read more

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March 3, 2016  |  Artists, MoMA PS1
Artists of Greater New York: Rosalind Fox Solomon
Rosalind Fox Solomon in her home studio, 2016. Photo: Caleb Bryant Miller

Rosalind Fox Solomon in her home studio, 2016. Photo: Caleb Bryant Miller

The Statue of Liberty obscured by scaffolding. A woman reclining comfortably on a couch, unaware of the boa constrictor uncoiling itself on the floor. A cherubic, blond-haired boy dressed in Quaker clothing looking straight at the camera, his blank expression conveying a wisdom beyond his years. Read more

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February 29, 2016  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions, Film
“Native Videographers Shoot Back”: An Interview with Adam and Zack Khalil

The 15th Doc Fortnight festival closes on February 29, 2016, with the world premiere of Adam Khalil and Zack Khalil’s INAATE/SE/ [it shines
 a certain way. to a certain place./it flies. falls./], the artists’ reflection on and reframing of their own Native American heritage. I recently spoke with the Khalil brothers about the concept and context for their film: Read more

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January 27, 2016  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
MoMA Collects: Simone Forti’s Dance Constructions

Before moving to New York in 1959, choreographer Simone Forti spent four heady, formative years in San Francisco. There, she trained with the postmodern dance pioneer Anna Halprin, who rejected the stylistic constraints of ballet and modern dance. On Halprin’s outdoor dance deck in wooded Marin County, Forti explored improvisation, her motions guided by a keen alertness to the body’s anatomy. She also organized open-work sessions with her then husband, the Minimalist artist Robert Morris, gathering artists for communal, multidisciplinary explorations of movement, objects, sound, and light. Read more

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January 21, 2016  |  Artists, MoMA PS1
Artists of Greater New York: Raúl de Nieves
Artist Raúl de Nieves with his Day(Ves) of Wonder. 2007–14. Mixed media. © 2016 Raúl de Nieves. Installation view, Greater New York, MoMA PS1, October 11, 2015–March 7, 2016. Photo: Caleb Bryant Miller

Artist Raúl de Nieves with his Day(Ves) of Wonder. 2007–14. Mixed media. © 2016 Raúl de Nieves. Installation view, Greater New York, MoMA PS1, October 11, 2015–March 7, 2016. Photo: Caleb Bryant Miller

I know sculptures can’t dance, but Raúl de Nieves’s Day(Ves) of Wonder looks like it might bust a move any minute. The three-foot piece—which depicts a humanoid figure in mid-groove, decked out in rainbow-colored platform boots, with swaying arms, cocked hips, and a sprawling, Medusa-like head—pulses with energy. Read more

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January 19, 2016  |  Artists
Celebrating Sophie Taeuber-Arp’s 127th Birthday
Sophie Taeuber-Arp with Dada Head. 1920. Photo: Nic Aluf. Stiftung Arp e.V., Berlin/Rolandswerth

Sophie Taeuber-Arp with Dada Head. 1920. Photo: Nic Aluf. Stiftung Arp e.V., Berlin/Rolandswerth

Today is the 127th birthday of Sophie Taeuber-Arp (1889–1943). In celebration of this beloved artist, whose face graces Switzerland’s 50 franc bill, Google invited MoMA to create a digital exhibition. We’ve included some beautifully crisp high-resolution images of her art—from one of her Dada Heads to paintings from the 1930s—alongside archival photos and views from recent exhibitions. Read more

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January 15, 2016  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Marcel Duchamp’s Readymades: Celebrating the Centennial
Marcel Duchamp’s letter to Suzanne Duchamp, January 15, 1916. Jean Crotti papers. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

Marcel Duchamp’s letter to Suzanne Duchamp, January 15, 1916. Jean Crotti papers. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Read the full translation below

In 1913 Marcel Duchamp topped a kitchen stool with a bicycle wheel, “fork down” through a hole he had drilled in the seat, and parked this wheel-on-a-stool in his Paris studio. “I didn’t have any special reason to do it,” he later recalled. Read more

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January 13, 2016  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Joaquín Torres-García’s Creative Paradox
Installation view of Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (October 25, 2015–February 15, 2016). Photo: Jonathan Muzikar. © 2016 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Installation view of Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (October 25, 2015–February 15, 2016). Photo: Jonathan Muzikar. © 2016 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

When Joaquín Torres-García returned to his native Uruguay in 1934, he was 60 years old and had lived abroad for more than 40 years. During the first years of his American relocation, before he became the referential Master at Taller Torres-García, he founded and directed the Asociación de Arte Constructivo, the achronym for which—AAC—appears signed on most of his paintings from 1935 to 1938. During these years Torres-García created a series of black-and-white abstract paintings that constitute one of the most striking repertoires of synthetic abstraction ever produced in the Americas. Read more

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December 22, 2015  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Larger Than Life: Picasso’s Sculpture through Brassaï’s Lens
Brassaï (Gyula Halász). Untitled (Pablo Picasso's Face, 1946). 1946. Gelatin silver print, 8 7/8 x 11 5/16" (22.6 x 28.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase. © Estate Brassaï-RMN

Brassaï (Gyula Halász). Untitled (Pablo Picasso’s Face, 1946). 1946. Gelatin silver print, 8 7/8 x 11 5/16″ (22.6 x 28.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase. © Estate Brassaï-RMN

Many great photographers during the 20th century rose to the challenge of capturing Pablo Picasso on film—Henri Cartier-Bresson, David Douglas Duncan, Gjon Mili, and Irving Penn spring to mind. Yet only one understood Picasso through his sculptures, allowing viewers to do the same in the absence of the originals: the Hungarian-born Brassaï. Read more

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The Junior Associates Visit with Artist Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons. How We See/Look 1/ Daria. 2014. Pigmented inkjet print, 78 x 48 “. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, 2014. © 2015 Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons. How We See/Look 1/ Daria. 2014. Pigmented inkjet print, 78 x 48″. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, 2014. © 2015 Laurie Simmons

Last year, The Junior Associates supported the Department of Photography’s acquisition of a recent work by the artist Laurie Simmons. This work, How We See/Look 1/Daria (2014), is part of Simmons’s How We See series, inspired by the practice in which individuals dress up as dolls or anime characters and paint eyes on their closed eyelids. Read more