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MoMA

AUTHOR: NAOMI KUROMIYA

Posts by Naomi Kuromiya
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Once Upon a Time: Archives Tales at the Van Abbemuseum

One of the many Contexts vitrines in Once Upon a Time…the Collection Now at the Van Abbemuseum

What kind of stories do a museum’s archives tell when read in tandem with masterpieces in their permanent collections? After allowing me to explore innovative exhibition strategies for archival material last summer, this year, MoMA’s intern travel grant gave me the opportunity to visit a Dutch museum that is contending with that exact question. Read more

Archivo-insite
October 7, 2013  |  Intern Chronicles, Library and Archives
Examining Archives Exhibition Strategies in Mexico City
Installation view of Arkheia exhibition Visita al Archivo Olivier Debroise: entre la ficcion y el documento, 2011.  Courtesy of Centro de Documentación Arkheia, MUAC, UNAM / Furniture design by Giacomo Castagnola.

Installation view of the Arkheia exhibition Visita al Archivo Olivier Debroise: entre la ficción y el documento, 2011. Courtesy of Centro de Documentación Arkheia, MUAC, UNAM. Furniture design by Giacomo Castagnola

Working with the fascinating collections in the MoMA Archives on a daily basis has led me to think about the ways in which archives share their unpublished material with the public. Read more

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March 25, 2013  |  Artists, Library and Archives
From the Archives: Robert Motherwell at MoMA, in His Own Words
Robert Motherwell. Pancho Villa, Dead and Alive. 1943. Cut-and-pasted printed and painted papers, wood veneer, gouache, oil, and ink on board, 28 1/4 x 35 7/8″ (71.7 x 91.1 cm). Purchase. Art © Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Image permission granted by Dedalus Foundation, Inc.

Robert Motherwell. Pancho Villa, Dead and Alive. 1943. Cut-and-pasted printed and painted papers, wood veneer, gouache, oil, and ink on board, 28 1/4 x 35 7/8″ (71.7 x 91.1 cm). Purchase. Art © Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Image permission granted by Dedalus Foundation, Inc.

One of the most fascinating aspects of working in the Museum Archives is uncovering how iconic artists engaged with MoMA beyond their artwork in the galleries. As one of the most celebrated Abstract Expressionist painters, Robert Motherwell has a rich exhibition history at the Museum that is traceable all the way back to 1944, when MoMA acquired its first work by Motherwell. Read more