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MoMA

AUTHOR: INGRID LANGSTON

Posts by Ingrid Langston
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April 24, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
The Inscrutable Gestures of Jasper Johns
Jasper Johns. Untitled. 2013. Ink on plastic, 27 1/2 × 36" (69.9 × 91.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Promised gift from a private collection. © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photo: Jerry Thompson

Jasper Johns. Untitled. 2013. Ink on plastic, 27 1/2 × 36″ (69.9 × 91.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Promised gift from a private collection. © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photo: Jerry Thompson

It caught my eye when I read last week that Jasper Johns has created a print on translucent paper for the May issue of Art in America magazine. Apparently, the print will feature several of Johns’s “signature motifs,” but the translucent paper might be considered somewhat of a signature motif in its own way. Read more

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December 12, 2012  |  Collection & Exhibitions
“What Can I Do with It?”: Activating Franz Erhard Walther’s First Work Set

On selected dates, trained activation facilitators have been stationed in the Drawings Galleries to assist visitors in using the interactive components of Franz Erhard Walther’s First Work Set—a unique work that requires the physical interaction of the viewer to be complete. Read more

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August 24, 2012  |  Collection & Exhibitions
Anonymous, Eponymous, Homonymous: Boetti’s Collaborative Process

Alighiero Boetti, the subject of the current retrospective exhibition Alighiero Boetti: Game Plan, always preferred collaborative initiatives over individual efforts, even when he was working by himself. Read more

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August 16, 2012  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Cut and Paste: Works by Franz West and Martha Rosler

Now that Photoshop has enabled complicated image manipulation with the click of a mouse, few of us still resort to using scissors, glue, and a stack of magazines to meet our collaging needs. Throughout the 20th century, however, the technique of collage was an essential strategy for successive generations of artists, from practitioners of Cubism and Dada to Pop art and beyond. Read more