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MoMA

AUTHOR: ELEONORE HUGENDUBEL

Posts by Eleonore Hugendubel
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Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language: Nora Schultz

Nora Schultz is a German artist working in Berlin whose work is currently included in the group exhibition Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language, on view until August 27, 2012. Read more

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August 10, 2012  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language: A Q&A with Dexter Sinister, Part 4

Here is the final installment of the four-part Q&A with Dexter Sinister, contributing artists to the exhibition Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language, on view in the Museum’s third-floor Special Exhibitions Gallery until August 27, 2012. Read more

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July 30, 2012  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language: A Q&A with Dexter Sinister, Part 3

Dexter Sinister’s work is currently included in the exhibition Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language (on view until August 27). Following part one and part two, here is the third part of the Q&A about their contribution to the show: the third issue of their journal Bulletins of The Serving Library doubling as the exhibition catalogue, plus a trailer. Read more

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July 17, 2012  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language: A Q&A with Dexter Sinister, Part 2

Today’s post is a continuation of a Q&A with Dexter Sinister, the artist collective that contributed to the exhibition Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language (on view until August 27). In the previous post, they discussed their contribution to the show: the third issue of their journal Bulletins of The Serving Library doubling as the exhibition catalogue, plus a trailer. Here is the next part of the conversation… Read more

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Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language: A Q&A with Dexter Sinister, Part 1

Dexter Sinister (David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey). Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language. 2012. Exhibition catalogue (cover), 224 pages plus insert, edited with Angie Keefer. With 13 “bulletins” by Andrew Blum, Pierre-André Boutang, Chris Evans, Angie Keefer, Bruno Latour, Louis Lüthi, Graham Meyer, Francis McKee, David Reinfurt, Dexter Sinister, Ian Svenonius, Benjamin Tiven, and Jessica Winter, and an essay by Laura Hoptman. Courtesy The Serving Library

Dexter Sinister (David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey) is an artist team whose practice collapses the often discrete activities of designing, editing, publishing, and distributing books and journals, both printed and in digital form. Read more

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June 16, 2011  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Katharina Fritsch in MoMA’s Garden

Katharina Fritsch. Figurengruppe. 2006–08 (fabricated 2010–11). Bronze, copper, and stainless steel, lacquered, dimensions variable. Gift of Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann (Laurenz Foundation). © 2011 Katharina Fritsch

A brilliant yellow Madonna, a set of skeleton feet, a grey giant leaning obdurately on his club, a green and boyish-looking St. Michael slaying the dragon, a pitch-black snake—these and other figures make up a curious cast of characters currently on view in MoMA’s Sculpture Garden.  Read more

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November 22, 2010  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Living and Growing at MoMA: Paula Hayes’s Installation in the Museum Lobby

MoMA’s lobby is a site of perpetual flux and frenzy, a public passageway for people to meet, greet, rest, or chat before embarking on their next experience, either inside or outside the Museum’s walls. When asked by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture, to think of forms that would visually complement and invigorate the rectangular and column-filled lobby space, Paula Hayes, a New York-based sculptor and landscape designer, who enjoys “knocking something off kilter a bit,” was ready to take up the challenge. Read more

Small Steps Lead to Bigger Changes: MoMA’s Shifting Wall Colors

On one of my recent early-morning checks of the fifth-floor collection galleries—a daily duty of the curatorial staff, to spot any oddities—an elusive, visceral feeling gave me pause. It took me a moment to recognize that it was prompted by the wall color, which, as I moved from the European Expressionist gallery to the adjacent Matisse room, had changed from a light grey to what appeared to be a bright white. This color change is subtle enough to likely go unnoticed by many visitors, but deserves a brief moment of attention.

View of Cézanne to Picasso: Paintings from the David and Peggy Rockefeller Collection, July 17, 2009–August 31, 2009. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: John Wronn

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