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MoMA

THIS WEEK AT MoMA: JULY 28–AUGUST 3

July 28, 2014  |  This Week at MoMA
This Week at MoMA: July 28–August 3

Along with this week’s picks, come to MoMA to see our newest exhibition, Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness, a vibrant retrospective of the influential photographer’s work.

Installation view of Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (July 27–November 2, 2014). Photo by Jonathan Muzikar. © 2014 The Museum of Modern Art

Installation view of Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (July 27–November 2, 2014). Photo by Jonathan Muzikar. © 2014 The Museum of Modern Art

• Stop by the Sculpture Garden today, Monday, July 28, for the final installment of Agora, MoMA’s monthlong series of informal discussions between visitors and Museum educators to explore open-ended questions relating to visitors’ museum experience.

• Don’t miss the first part of our Carte Blanche screening series selected by photographer Christopher Williams, which continues through Tuesday, July 29, and includes Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Ordet and Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant.

• Join a free Gallery Sessions tour, Create Your Own Conceptual Art, on Wednesday, July 30, to explore the history of Conceptual art—and then create your own.

• On Thursday, July 31, join us for MoMA Nights, when the Museum galleries are open until 8:00 p.m. and musicians perform in the Sculpture Garden at 6:30 p.m., with dining and snack options available outside and in our Terrace 5 café. This week’s performance is by Seattle-based band La Luz, who channel 1960s girl-group/garage bands and beach vibes.

Annie Hall. 1977. USA. Directed by Woody Allen

Annie Hall. 1977. USA. Directed by Woody Allen

• Take advantage of a “summer Friday” and take in a midday screening of Woody Allen’s beloved Annie Hall on Friday, August 1, as part of An Auteurist History of Film.

• And finally, don’t miss the final days of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010, the sweeping survey of Sigmar Polke’s work in all mediums—called “Wondrous…the most dramatic museum show of the century to date” by The New Yorker—which closes on Sunday, August 3.

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