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MoMA

INSIDE/OUT: A MoMA/MoMA PS1 BLOG

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Dieter Roth’s Bunny Leaves More Than Just Chocolate and Jelly Beans

Without question, one of the most popular works in the Dieter Roth exhibition Wait, Later This Will Be Nothing, is the seasonally appropriate Bunny-dropping-bunny (Karnickelköttelkarnickel). With Easter just around the corner, jelly bean eggs and chocolate bunnies seem to be everywhere, including here in the galleries at MoMA. Read more

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Exhibiting Fluxus: Decomposition Contained in Wait Later This Will Be Nothing: Editions by Dieter Roth

The title of the exhibition Wait Later This Will Be Nothing: Editions by Dieter Roth befits a number of the works on display that are slowly decomposing in front of spectators’ eyes. This post is dedicated to one particular pocket-sized perishable—Roth’s Pocket Room (Taschenzimmer) from MoMA’s Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection. In 1968, Dieter Roth—who challenged the boundaries of printmaking and publishing by integrating cheese, fruit, sausage, chocolate, and other organic materials into the process—released an unlimited edition comprising a banana slice on stamped paper tucked inside of a plastic container small enough to fit into the owner’s pocket. Read more

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March 27, 2013  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Publications
From Artists Books to Performances, Updated MoMA Highlights Shines Spotlight on a New Set of Works
Cover of MoMA Highlights: 350 Works from The Museum of Modern Art, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Cover of MoMA Highlights: 350 Works from The Museum of Modern Art, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Although the word “modern” will always spark some debate over its definition, The Museum of Modern Art has been committed since its founding in 1929 to collecting and sharing with the public the most compelling art of our time. Read more

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March 26, 2013  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Jean Genet’s A Song of Love and Jean Cocteau’s Testament of Orpheus
Testament of Orpheus. 1960. France. Directed by Jean Cocteau

Testament of Orpheus. 1960. France. Directed by Jean Cocteau

These notes accompany screenings of Jean Genet’s A Song of Love and Claude Chabrol’s Testament of Orpheus on March 27, 28, and 29 in Theater 2.

Jean Genet’s (1910–1986) association with the cinema was peripheral. Read more

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March 25, 2013  |  Artists, Library and Archives
From the Archives: Robert Motherwell at MoMA, in His Own Words
Robert Motherwell. Pancho Villa, Dead and Alive. 1943. Cut-and-pasted printed and painted papers, wood veneer, gouache, oil, and ink on board, 28 1/4 x 35 7/8″ (71.7 x 91.1 cm). Purchase. Art © Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Image permission granted by Dedalus Foundation, Inc.

Robert Motherwell. Pancho Villa, Dead and Alive. 1943. Cut-and-pasted printed and painted papers, wood veneer, gouache, oil, and ink on board, 28 1/4 x 35 7/8″ (71.7 x 91.1 cm). Purchase. Art © Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Image permission granted by Dedalus Foundation, Inc.

One of the most fascinating aspects of working in the Museum Archives is uncovering how iconic artists engaged with MoMA beyond their artwork in the galleries. As one of the most celebrated Abstract Expressionist painters, Robert Motherwell has a rich exhibition history at the Museum that is traceable all the way back to 1944, when MoMA acquired its first work by Motherwell. Read more

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MoMA Celebrates 1913: Olga Rozanova’s Utinoe gnezdyshko…durnykh slov (A Little Duck’s Nest…of Bad Words)


MoMA’s celebration of the landmark year 1913 continues with the seventh in a series of videos highlighting important works from 1913 in the Museum’s collection. Read more

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Dieter Roth’s “Nothing” Is Really Quite Something

Cover of the exhibition catalogue Wait, Later This Will Be Nothing: Editions by Dieter Roth, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Cover of the exhibition catalogue Wait, Later This Will Be Nothing: Editions by Dieter Roth, published by The Museum of Modern Art


Pulled from Dieter Roth’s masterpiece, Snow (1964/69), the title of MoMA’s latest book initially reads as something of a dare to stick around: Wait, Later This Will Be Nothing: Editions by Dieter Roth. Whether from the curiosity to see how it ends or the desire to possess something fleeting, this call to action sparked our appetite to consume Roth’s editions slowly in order to savor what might not last. Read more

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March 21, 2013  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Design
Coding a Title Wall

It’s always exciting to try new things as part of MoMA’s graphic design team. In the case of Applied Design, the new Department of Architecture and Design exhibition curated by Paola Antonelli and Kate Carmody, we got to challenge ourselves by using technology featured in the show to program a moving, dynamic title wall. Read more

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Wait, later this will be nothing. No really, I’ve seen it for myself.

Exhibition research often takes curators to archives, museums, private collections, and galleries. These are usually pristine spaces, where voices are hushed, light levels are low, and temperature and humidity are carefully controlled. But I experienced something very different as I investigated the work of Dieter Roth (Swiss, born Germany. 1930–1998), featured in the current exhibition Wait, Later This Will Be Nothing: Editions by Dieter Roth. Read more

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March 19, 2013  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s Suddenly, Last Summer
Katharine Hepburn, Montgomery Clift, and Elizabeth Taylor in Suddenly, Last Summer. 1959. USA. Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Katharine Hepburn, Montgomery Clift, and Elizabeth Taylor in Suddenly, Last Summer. 1959. USA. Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

These notes accompany screenings of Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s Suddenly, Last Summer on March 20, 21, and 22 in Theater 3.

I’ve included Suddenly, Last Summer not so much for its intrinsic virtues (of which it certainly has some) but more as a case study in how complicated auteurism can become Read more