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MoMA

INSIDE/OUT: A MoMA/MoMA PS1 BLOG

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April 29, 2011  |  Five for Friday
Five for Friday: Basketball and Art

Five for Friday, written by a variety of MoMA staff members, is our attempt to spotlight some of the compelling, charming, and downright curious works in the Museum’s rich collection.

Jocks and nerds don’t mix, in theory, but sports and art overlap more often than one might think. In the case of basketball, players such as Bill Russell paved the way by attending beat poetry readings and collecting art. Many current and recent players boast impressive art collections and are becoming more involved with the art world. Read more

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April 29, 2011  |  Off the Shelf
Off the Shelf: Our Poetry Muses

The Off the Shelf series explores unique MoMA publications from the Museum Archives.

Right: Cover of A Partridge in a Pear Tree, illustrated by Ben Shahn. Second ed. New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1951. Left: Frontispiece from 12 Fables of Aesop, illustrated by Antonio Frasconi; narrated by Glenway Wescott. New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1954.

April is National Poetry Month! To celebrate the final days we thought we’d look at MoMA poetry books. MoMA has published a number of books of poetry, from the lyrically illustrated and hand-lettered A Partridge in a Pear Tree (1951), by Ben Shahn, to 12 Fables of Aesop (1954), illustrated by Antonio Frasconi and narrated by Glenway Wescott. One of my favorites is Three Young Rats and Other Rhymes, the delightfully illustrated book of 83 nursery rhymes selected by former MoMA curator James Johnson Sweeney and illustrated by Alexander Calder. Read more

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April 28, 2011  |  Artists, Looking at Music 3.0, Videos
Cey Adams: An Insider’s Look at Hip-hop Culture

We caught up with Cey Adams, founding creative director of Def Jam Recordings, in MoMA’s Looking at Music 3.0 exhibition gallery, and he talked to us about his work, the emergence of hip-hop, and his unwavering allegiance to the possibilities of culture. Read more

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April 28, 2011  |  Counter Space
Hidden Kitchens

Virgilio Forchiassin. Spazio Vivo (Living Space) Mobile Kitchen Unit. 1968

Counter Space: Design and the Modern Kitchen addresses the role of the kitchen in 20th-century life. But what does modern design mean if you don’t have a kitchen? If you live, say, alone in a wagon in the Nevada desert? Or you reside in your taxicab, and you want Brazilian food that reminds you of home? Read more

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“I went to MoMA and…”: It Looks Like This, Mr. Picasso!

Reading the “I went to MoMA and…” notecards, we’ve started to notice the guitars… a lot of guitars. People draw guitars of all shapes and sizes; realistic guitars, Cubist guitars, abstract guitars; guitars by kids, guitars by grownups, guitars by people from many different countries. The inspiration, of course, for this outpouring of guitar drawings is our current exhibition Picasso: Guitars 1912–1914. Read more

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April 26, 2011  |  An Auteurist History of Film
John Ford’s The Grapes of Wrath

The Grapes of Wrath. 1940. USA. Directed by John Ford

The Grapes of Wrath. 1940. USA. Directed by John Ford

These notes accompany the screenings of John Ford’s The Grapes of Wrath on April 27, 28, and 29 in Theater 2.

Orson Welles once told Peter Bogdanovich, “John Ford knows what the earth is made of.” Although Welles probably did not intend this to be a cryptic observation, it does lend itself to several interpretations. It could have certain geologic connotations, referring perhaps to the Paleocene epoch, when complex life began to form. It could also refer to the even more complex development that came after—those troublesome bipeds that became us. If all this sounds a bit pompous for a director who spent much of his early career making mostly mindless two-reel westerns, so be it. Read more

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April 25, 2011  |  Design, Off the Shelf
Off the Shelf: Design Finds

The Off the Shelf series explores unique MoMA publications from the Museum Archives.

Whether an attractive cover, unusual paper, or unique layout draws you in, no doubt you have experienced the joys of a beautifully designed book. Along these lines, every year AIGA selects the best in book and book cover design for its 50 Books/50 Covers award. Read more

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April 25, 2011  |  Artists, Impressions from South Africa
Spotlight: Cameron Platter in Impressions from South Africa, 1965 to Now

Cameron Platter. Life Is Very Interesting. 2007. Digital print. Publisher: the artist, Shaka's Rock, KwaZulu-Natal. Printer: Orms ProPhoto Lab, Cape Town. Edition: 5. The Museum of Modern Art. General Print Fund

It’s not common to hear an artist being described as “the delinquent love child of Quentin Tarantino and Dr. Seuss.” So when I read that about artist Cameron Platter, my interest was immediately piqued—specifically in relation to two recently acquired works by the artist, currently on view in Impressions from South Africa, 1965 to Now in the Prints and Illustrated Books Galleries. Read more

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April 22, 2011  |  Five for Friday
Five for Friday: Get Your Green On

Five for Friday, written by a variety of MoMA staff members, is our attempt to spotlight some of the compelling, charming, and downright curious works in the Museum’s rich collection. In honor of Earth Day, here are some eco-friendy—and eco-scary—works to help you get your green on. Read more

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April 21, 2011  |  Library and Archives
Bookeye for a Fly-By

Okay, animation isn’t the primary function of the MoMA Library’s new face-up book scanner/copier. But it gives an idea of how it works and image quality. If you think about it, turning books upside-down to copy pages is counterintuitive—and really bad for preserving books. The “Bookeye” is designed to make quality images while minimizing stress on bound materials. There’s a bit of a learning curve, but even tech-shy researchers are using it. Read more