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Cedric Price. Fun Palace for Joan Littlewood Project, Stratford East, London, England, Perspective. 1959-61

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Cedric Price (British, 1934–2003)

Fun Palace for Joan Littlewood Project, Stratford East, London, England, Perspective

Date:
1959-61
Medium:
Felt-tipped pen, ink, graphite, crayon and ink stamp on tracing paper with tape
Dimensions:
6 1/2 x 15 7/8" (16.5 x 40.3 cm)
Credit Line:
Gift of The Howard Gilman Foundation
MoMA Number:
1231.2000

Terence Riley, ed., The Changing of the Avant-Garde: Visionary Architectural Drawings from the Howard Gilman Collection, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2002, p. 44

The Fun Palace was commissioned by Joan Littlewood, founder of the Theater Workshop at the Theater Royal, Isle of Dogs, in the East End of London. Price's first large-scale project was to be a "laboratory of fun" and "a university of the streets," as its patron described it. Inspired by a fascination with technology, Price planned for an open steel-gridded structure that could support a completely flexible program. Hanging rooms for dancing, music, and drama; mobile floors, walls, ceilings, and walkways; and advanced temperature systems that could disperse and control fog, warm air, and moisture were all intended to promote active "fun."

Bevin Cline and Tina di Carlo

Terence Riley, ed., The Changing of the Avant-Garde: Visionary Architectural Drawings from the Howard Gilman Collection, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2002

Cedric Price came on to the British architectural scene in the late 1950s, a time in which housing complexes, schools, industrial parks and new towns were springing up all over Britain. There was an overriding belief in a socially responsibly architecture and general feeling of optimism about the future and architecture's capacity to improve the environment. Price, however, was determined that his work would not impose physical or psychological constraints upon its occupants nor reduce them to standards, as did modernist architecture. Through the pairing of humor and playfulness with complete conviction, Price's projects all attest to his belief in an architecture that provides inhabitants as well as viewers individual freedoms. Technology, based on the paradigm of a flexible network rather than a static structure, played an essential role in Price's work.

Bevin Cline and Tina di Carlo

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