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Antonio Bonet (Spanish, 1913–1989)

About this artist

Source: Oxford University Press

Spanish architect, urban planner and designer, also active in Argentina and Uruguay. He graduated from the Escuela Superior de Arquitectura, Barcelona, in 1936, having also worked during 1932–6 in the offices of Josep Lluís Sert and, in Paris, of Le Corbusier. In 1938 he went to Buenos Aires and there became a founder member of Grupo Austral, together with (among others) Jorge Hardoy (b 1914) and Juan Kurchan, with whom he had worked in Paris. Bonet applied the rationalist principles of the group’s manifesto Voluntad y acción (1939) in a wide range of architectural and urban-design projects in Argentina and Uruguay over the next two decades. He is perhaps most widely known for his individual houses, and especially for the Casa Berlingieri (1946) at Punta Ballena, Uruguay, and (with Jorge Vivanco and Valera Peluffo) for the four pavilions at Martínez, Buenos Aires, in a manner reminiscent of Le Corbusier’s work of a decade or so earlier, although quite original in expression. As a planner Bonet was involved in the master-plans for Mendoza (1940) and the Casa Amarilla housing development (1943), Buenos Aires; he was a member of the San Juan reconstruction committee in 1944 and worked on the South Buenos Aires Urban Development Plan (1956). He was also a noted furniture designer, and he taught architecture as a visiting professor (1950) at Tucumán National University. Among many buildings in the 1950s, Bonet designed the Casa Oks (1955), part of a larger housing development at Martínez, the Galería Rivadavia and Terraza Flats (1957–9) and the Galería de las Américas (1958–62), all in Mar del Plata. In 1963 he returned to Spain to practise in Girona and Barcelona; his best-known building of this later period is the Urquinaona Tower (1971), Barcelona. He nevertheless continued periodic visits to Argentina, where he established the Bonet award for Argentine students of architecture.

Ludovico C. Koppmann
From Grove Art Online

© 2009 Oxford University Press

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