• Mezzanine, Cullman Education and Research Building

The first Futurist Manifesto, published in 1909 by poet and writer F. T. Marinetti, proclaimed a burning desire—fueled by industry, war, and the machine—to race into the future. Italian Futurists followed suit by calling for a new aesthetic language appropriate for these modern times. On the one hundredth anniversary of Futurism's founding, this exhibition explores the movement's aesthetic and political concerns with a display of books, manifestos, periodicals, and handwritten correspondence by Futurist artists.

Organized by Laura Beiles, Associate Educator, Department of Education.